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Run,Training,Triathlon Philippines

Slow Jogging: science-based natural running for weigh-loss, health & performance benefits

15 Dec , 2017  

Multisports,Tips and tricks,Training,Triathlon News,Triathlon Philippines

Ironman training: Tips for getting faster and stronger

11 Dec , 2017  

The key swim sessions, cardio workouts and core strength exercises in the Barclay armoury

1. Utilise speed surges

Our key swim strength set is a weekly 3.8km with speed surges. This 60-90min session replicates what happens during an Ironman. It works best with two people of a similar swimming ability.
Warm-up 400m building intensity.
Main set 500m Swimmer 1 (S1) leads with Swimmer 2 (S2) drafting on their toes then S2 surges to take the lead for 500m. Repeat this pattern for 400m, twice for 300m, once for 200m, and twice for 100m.
Cool-down 3 x 100m easy.

2. Mix cardio with intensity

 

jualyn triathlon philippines

Aim for a mix of intensity and steady swimming in your swim sets. We aim to swim 4-5 times per week. Depending on the phase of training, between three and four of these sessions will involve quite a bit of intensity. Then the other one or two sessions will be strictly cardio with some technique and drills. A swim background will provide you with the cardiovascular fitness to succeed in triathlon. But, more than anything, swimming will give you mental strength.

3. Core strength is key

Core strength and shoulder stability are essential to swimming, so this should be a big part of your strength training. Other exercises such as weighted chin-ups, lat pull-downs and bent-over rows are important for building the power of each arm pull through the water. We usually perform chin-ups to failure and repeat x3. This is around 10-15 reps depending on the additional weight added. To get the benefit of lat pull-downs and bent-over rows, we complete 3 rounds of 10-15 reps.

Make bike strength your goal
A big bike strength set will build endurance for Ironman racing. But don’t forget to refuel and build your core, says Lucy

4. Build base endurance

Perform a long bike set with a mix of intensities to build base endurance for Ironman and 70.3 racing, and sharpen up your body in the build-up. My key bike strength set is 2:30hrs. I perform it weekly, but not on race week, and use a turbo.

Warm-up 15mins building intensity.
Main set 5 x [20mins at between Ironman and 70.3 power/intensity (depending on the phase of training you’re in), followed by 5mins recovery easy spinning].
Cool-down 10mins easy spinning.

5. Refuelling focus

Ensure you keep your body fuelled during a long ride. I use gels and bars and, once home, I’ll have a protein shake with frozen berries, milk and peanut butter while preparing my favourite post-training meal of gluten-free toast, two poached eggs, half an avocado and grated cheese. I spend a good 15-20mins foam rolling after a long bike session and then rest and recover in my recovery gear from Compressport.

6. Make S&C bike specific

As well as the basic core exercises such as the plank and sit-ups, free weight leg exercises will build strength for the bike. These challenge the core muscles while working the legs, so it’s more specific to cycling. These exercises include: squats, lunges, deadlifts and single-leg squats using the TRX suspension resistance bands. Also look to do pre-emptive ‘Prehab’ work to prevent you from getting injuries, improve posture and to sort out any muscle

Strength training for cycling: 6 key exercises

Follow your S&C with informed recovery
Don’t forget the strength and conditioning when training for tri, says Lucy imbalances.

7. Aim for sustained strength

Our 2-3 S&C weekly sessions are key for sustained Ironman strength.

Warm-up 5mins of rowing, 3 x 10 kettle bell goblet squats.
Set 1 3 x 15 squats with barbell weight, 45secs rest.
Set 2 3 x 10 (each leg) lunges with barbell weight, 45secs rest.
Set 3 3 x 15 leg press (75kg), 3 x 15 calf raises (75kg), 45secs rest.
Set 4 3 x 15 leg extensions (30kg), 3 x 15 hamstring curl (20kg), 45secs rest.
Set 5 3 x [10 ab wheel roll out, 60secs plank, 45secs flutter kicks].
Cool-down 5mins easy spinning.

8. Supplement your diet

I use a wide range of supplements to complement my diet. These include calcium, iron, glucosamine and CurraNZ (a blackcurrant extract from New Zealand) that promotes blood circulation, oxygen delivery and fat burning. All my supplements are from the batch-tested range at Informed-Sport. Post-session, I use Vanilla Whey protein powder from MyProtein.com. I normally have two protein shakes per day after sessions, both with a 25g scoop of protein powder.

9. Don’t forget to R&R

Rest and recovery is just as important as performing the hard training and gym-based sessions; it’s the glue that holds everything together. I foam roll and stretch at least once a day, especially after a hard bike or run session. I also use compression gear to keep the blood flowing around the body after training. In addition to this, we’re lucky to have a set of Normatec boots, the pulsing compression device that seems to work wonders on our tired legs.

Hills, trails and drills are key for an iron core
Variety in your strength training will pay dividends on the run come Ironman race day, says Reece. Here’s why…

10. Hit the hills

Hill reps are key for building strength and endurance. We perform this 60min run set weekly but it’s reduced in volume on race week and used as a sharpening set.

Warm-up 2-3km of steady running.
Main set 1 5 x 2mins uphill road reps working hard. Recovery is the easy jog back down the hill to your start point. Then do a steady jog of 2-3km steady running to break up the session.
Main set 2 5 x 2mins uphill road reps working hard. Recovery is the easy jog back down the hill to your start point.
Cool-down 1-2 km easy jogging back home.

11. Combine reps and off-road

We’re lucky to have some great trails near us in Epping Forest. We combine our weekly hill reps with off-road running to build strength and make us more resilient.

12. Seek a strong core

Having a strong core will help you maintain good run posture, especially when you’re fatigued on the Ironman marathon run leg. Aim to perform drills such as high knees, lunge rotations and bounding before your run sessions.

13. Don’t suffer alone

It’s easier to hurt your way through a tough set when you know you’re not suffering alone. We’ve had to learn to not always push each other and back off the intensity when the sessions are meant to be easy. Which is easier said then done given our competitive natures!

14 Key Iron fuelling

The essential food and drink supplies in the Reece Barclay and Lucy Charles shopping basket.

Tomato soup: each bowl of tomato soup contains vitamins E, A, C, K, essential minerals and antioxidants. It tastes great, too.
Nuts & berries: snacking on nuts and berries in between meals helps us from turning to the treat cupboard, which isn’t always easy!
Avocado: these provide us with healthy monounsaturated fatty acids and a good dose of natural vitamins and mineral
Protein powder: quick and easy whey protein powder after workouts kickstarts our recovery so that we’re prepared for our next session(s)
Chicken: chicken salads for lunch or chicken curry for dinner. Both are quick and easy to prepare and offer a protein boost.
Coffee: we drink coffee because of its stimulant properties and taste. After 12pm we switch to decaffeinated.
Eggs: poached eggs with avocado is a great breakfast. They’re a source of protein and vitamins, and keep you feeling full.
Carbs: we recently switched to gluten-free foods, such as bread and pasta, and instantly felt less bloated and lethargic.

Blogs,Events,News,Run,Training,Triathlon News,Triathlon Philippines

How to improve running technique?

31 Oct , 2017  

athletic drills

How to improve running technique? 😉 #athleticdrill #coordination #strength #rhytm #bodymovement #posture #armmovement #feelfortherunningsteps We are ready – feel free to ask for #training #running #swimming #cycling #Norway #keepgoing (y) Jakub Opočenský jopocoaching@gmail.com sportovní kempy pro děti a mládež 😉 Kasper Trutnovský kemp 2017 Kasper Trutnovský kemp 2017 ABB Trutnovský Půlmaraton 😉

Posted by JOPO COACHING on Thursday, May 18, 2017

Events,Races,Training,Triathlon News,Triathlon Philippines

DON’T BE AFRAID TO FAIL ( Triathlon Motivation 2017)

7 Sep , 2017  

Bike,Multisports,News,Nutrition,Training,Triathlon News,Triathlon Philippines

Tips preparation for long ride

3 Sep , 2017  

WHAT: Long Ride
WHEN: September 2, 2017
WHERE: Singapore going to Malaysia

kulai ride triathlon philippines

1. Think about your fuel and plan ahead
kulai ride triathlon philippines

 

before we start cycling some instruction given by our group leader Silver after 50km re-group then take 5mins. rest and photo ops. Don’t forget to bring your passport for immigration checking on entering Malaysia and leaving Malaysia .

 

To really have good endurance you need to make the most of your internal reserves. These are glycogen (carbohydrate) in the muscles and liver, glucose in the bloodstream, triglycerides (fats) stored in the muscles and that all-important biggest store of fuel: body fat.

So which of these fuel tanks is most responsible for keeping you riding? Well, it won’t be a lack of fats, lactic acid overload or a lack of oxygen that makes you get off the bike. Instead, running out of muscle glycogen, low liver glycogen or low blood glucose levels is what will stop you in your tracks. One or all three of these will cause the infamous ‘bonk’, ‘wall’ or ‘the knock’.

Are you eating enough food to fuel your cycling?
kulai ride triathlon philippines
2. Increase your carbohydrate intake (kanin at ulam)

To elongate your endurance you need to make sure that before long rides you have one or two days where you ensure that carbohydrate foods are eaten every three hours, with plenty of water consumed with each meal. This carbo-loading helps you stock up with muscle glycogen, but only if you ride very easy on these days. Carbo-loading but hammering short, sharp rides because you feel good does not maximise glycogen.
ally laurente triathlon philippines

Veteran cyclist and triathlete sir ally 🙂

3. Eat an early pre-ride breakfast

Even starting with your glycogen stores stocked up does not guarantee you maximal endurance. The morning of the ride you should get an early breakfast of carbs, protein and fat around two to three hours before you head out.

Eat too close, say an hour before, and you’ll reduce rather than increase your endurance. So, either get up early or drink a carb-rich drink as you leave the house to start riding.
kulai ride triathlon philippines
4. Stay topped up throughout your ride

Aim for 200 to 400 calories in liquid or solid form but know (by trying them out on training rides ahead of the main event) that they sit well on your stomach. If you are confident that your levels are high, you can start a ride fasted, but you need to feed religiously every 20 minutes or you will crash soon after missing one or two feeds. Aim for around 60 grams of carbs per hour during the ride as an estimate.

Researchers in the USA have shown that consuming 15g honey or glucose taken every 10 miles during a 64km ride improves performance compared to water alone. Riders with the high glycaemic glucose and low glycaemic honey got home 2.75 minutes earlier, having averaged almost 40 watts more output over the last 10 miles compared to water drinking-only riders.

If you find you regularly get dropped at the end of rides and have been riding on water alone, this research is especially for you!

5. Train your body for endurance

To really get the most from your body, start in the weeks, or rather months, beforehand with regular riding to make your body fitter and better at using its fat stores. Fit riders use higher amounts of fats and are more efficient at stretching out carbohydrate reserves. Use this simple reminder about what makes you fitter: A B C. That is, Aerobic riding four to six hours a week, Breakfast-less rides for up to two hours to make your body fat-burning savvy, and Consistency.

Teaching your body to go longer is a talent that is earned. If you do have a tendency to do too much, then lose motivation, ride yourself into illness or always feel you’re the only person who never seems to progress, take heart. Almost anyone can extend their endurance and achieve 100k, 100 miles or more. You may not set a competition record along the way but you can still make the distance.
kulai ride triathlon philippines
Consistent riding gives you improved endurance and better use of fats. Once you start to increase your longest ride, the challenge is to set a bigger goal every second or third week. By taking yourself physically and mentally into new time-zones you experience the feeding, pacing and fatigue tests that new horizons bring. Choose riding buddies with a similar or higher stamina and stay close together so you can encourage each other.

6. don’t forget your buddy

if you feel weak while cycling don’t forget to treat your buddy a cold soft drinks, bread and banana. Make sure he is good and well that he never leave you even you had plat tires or any technical problem. or dami pang palusot (bonk). this ride was awesome and well organized and definitely going this again.
kulai ride triathlon philippines

photo credit by: Silver

Blogs,Event News,Multisport,Multisports,Tips and tricks,Training,Triathlon News,Triathlon Philippines

Triathlon Training Tips

23 Jul , 2017  

riptide singapore
1. Train alone

When I first started my career in triathlon, I got to a certain level by training with my buddies, in groups and non-structured environments. I then left for a while and came back with a whole new attitude. I found a coach I liked and really appreciated his ideas. So I committed myself to the training. I rarely trained with people. Eighty-five to 90 percent of the training I did alone, which worked for me. So if I were climbing a hill and my heart rate spiked, I’d walk up the hill. This created self-confidence. I came out and won my first race by training alone, which was Wildflower, a tough course.

riptide

2. Do drills

People neglect cycling and running drills. I did them. So on race day I would lose as little fitness as possible. I could be more efficient, not really falling apart halfway through the marathon because of the training drills. The reality is you should be doing drills all the time, year in and year out. I was different than a lot of pros by doing that.

riptide
3. Train for a race

Don’t train for general fitness. I think I was one of the first to train on the Big Island. I trained in the heat and learned the currents of the water. When I did Wildflower, I’d incorporate rides and runs similar to that course. I found out the course had lots of trails and hills, so I thought, okay, I need to run hills and train specific to that course.

4. Put yourself in pain

This one is kind of sadistic. I always had this problem of my stomach shutting down during the marathon of an Ironman. So I thought if I could run with my stomach shutting down, I could do it in a race. So once a week I would sit down and eat nachos with really spicy hot sauce. Then I’d get my running gear on, go for a run and of course, my stomach would shut down, but I’d just keep going. They were brutal training runs. But then on race day, when my stomach would shut down I’d think, “I can deal with this.” I’d be able to keep going. Doing this paid off so many times over. I’d do this 10 weeks out from Ironman until two weeks before race day. It’d be a horrible run, but it had a huge impact on my overall race performance.

5. Spend the dough

I see this with a lot of age-groupers. They spend so much time and effort training for an Ironman and they don’t bother to get new tires or get a tune-up. Get new tires. Get a new chain if you need it. You’ve invested so much time, just pay the couple of extra bucks. Don’t cheap out. It’s worth the extra expense.

6. Get out of shape

I got this piece of advice from Paula Newby-Fraser and it was one of the best things I have heard. She told me, “Peter, you can have a great short career or you can have a great long career. But you need to take time to leave the sport behind you.” Basically, you need to get out of shape to get back into shape. You need to physically and mentally recharge. You need to become a non-athlete. Don’t eat healthy. It hurts your fitness, sure, but it makes for a better long-term career. Mark Allen did this and it worked for him. Doing this prepares your body for another season. It was so easy for me to do this because two legends told me they did it. It felt like a part of the puzzle of being pro.

7. Don’t workout when sick

I see so many athletes tinker with their workouts when they are sick. Don’t. Take the day off.

BMC singapore

8. Know your body

If you head out the door and your knee hurts, don’t push through it because then all of a sudden you’re injured and you are out. Stop exercising and take a couple of days off rather than be out a couple of weeks.

tips from www.triathlete.com

Multisports,Tips and tricks,Training,Triathlon News,Triathlon Philippines

How To Fix A Bike Puncture – Repairing An Inner Tube

4 Jul , 2017  

Multisport,Training,Triathlon,Triathlon News

Top 10 Triathlon Tips

31 Mar , 2017  

Event News,Training,Triathlon Philippines

Morning Ride at Changi Coast Road

10 Jan , 2017  

Training,Triathlon News,Triathlon Philippines

What is Zone 1 means in training? ano b yun?

19 Aug , 2016  

ironman aus age group sunset

Heart rate training can be confusing due to the many different types of terminology used and the many opinions on how we determine what our threshold zone is. Additionally, there are many different charts that give us a variety of ranges which adds to the confusion. This is an example of information overload, and to a beginner triathlete, this can seem incredibly confusing. My goal for this article is that you have a good understanding on how and why to test for heart rate zones, which training zones you should spend the most time in, and to make this a simple process.

All of the BT training plans were created with these heart rate zones in mind.

We’ll start with the definition of Training Zones:

A definition of Zone 1 is that it’s a super easy effort, probably a 4/10 on the Rate of Perceived Exertion (RPE) – see chart at end. It’s so easy that you should feel ‘guilty’ when you are done. You don’t think you went hard enough; it didn’t feel like a workout; you don’t think there was any benefit because it felt too easy, etc. If you have these types of thoughts after a Zone 1 workout, then congratulations, you are doing it right!

I call this the “Guilty Zone.”

A definition of Zone 2 is a bit more complicated, as it should feel pretty easy, at least in the beginning. But you should feel as though you have to work if you’ve been doing this several hours. You may even see cardiac drift towards the end of this workout. How easy is easy for Zone 2? I would recommend somewhere around 5-6/10 on the RPE scale. You should be able to hold a conversation for the duration of this workout, and I mean being able to talk in full sentences, not 1 or 2 word gasps.

This is what I call the “Conversation Zone.”

Zone 3 gets a little gray, and literally it is a ‘gray zone’. You typically aren’t going easy enough to get the benefits of a nice easy effort and you aren’t going hard enough to get the benefits of a ‘Race Pace’ type workout. This is an effort of about 7/10 on the RPE scale, and you can talk in one to two word answers.

I actually call this zone the NBZ – “No Benefit Zone.”

Zone 4 is your “Race Pace” zone – this is where you have burning legs and lungs and you can’t keep the effort up for much more than an hour. And yes, you have to be pretty fit to keep this effort up for an hour, but by definition, your threshold is an effort you can manage for one hour. You know when you are in Zone 4 as your breathing is labored, your arms and legs get very heavy and all you want to do is stop. This effort is 8-9+ on the RPE scale.

Zone 5 and up are for shorter efforts and these are usually 9+ to 10 type of efforts on the RPE scale. These efforts may last from a few seconds to maybe five or six minutes. This zone is beneficial if you are doing a lot of racing that has hard but very short efforts, such as bike racing or racing short events on the track in running.

Since this article is geared toward endurance athletes and our races our typically one hour or more, let’s understand how our training should be set up. Consider that a 400m race around the track that takes world class runners about 40 seconds to complete is around 86% aerobic. Now, if you are running a 5k, how much of that race do you think is aerobic? The answer is probably somewhere around 97-99%. For the average athlete the percentage of zone training for each zone should be roughly:

80-85% Zone 1 and Zone 2
10-15% Zone 4
2-5% of Zone 5
(For those of us you are training for half ironman distances and above there should be a percentage of Zone 3 training as well, but still that percentage may only 15-20% a week.)

The importance of Zone 1 and Zone 2 Training

Zone 1 and 2 training is important because the benefits of these workouts. You build endurance, durability and strength. In addition, these easy training sessions help build capillary pathways that transport oxygen to your muscles and carry waste (lactate) away from your muscles. The more capillary pathways that you can build, the more efficient you will be. Efficiency is equal to free speed.

If at first you can’t keep your HR under Zone 2, then you need to slow down. If that means you run for 3 minutes and walk for 2 minutes to keep your HR down then by all means do it. For a fit athlete getting back into training, I recommend not training with the heart rate monitor for 2 weeks and then put it on once you have a sense of fitness coming back. You may find that training in Zone 2 and under is a step back, but you will see the progress over time and will be thankful you were patient enough to try this.

Adaptation for everyone will be different. Some people will see changes right away, and for others it may take months. Just this year I had an athlete drop about 40 seconds a mile on his long runs after 2 months of Zone 2 training, and he’s been racing and training for over 20 years! So, at any level improvement is possible, but you need to have faith in the philosophy and above all else, be patient.

Determining your zones

Determining training zones is a simple process and I’ve written quite a bit on this before. If you are an experienced athlete you can use this method: http://www.beginnertriathlete.com/cms/article-detail.asp?articleid=633

For those of you who are new to training you might want to try this article: http://www.beginnertriathlete.com/cms/article-detail.asp?articleid=1243

In conclusion, it’s my hope you’ll follow the methods here in your training and see what great improvements training in Zone 1 and 2 will bring you.

RPE Scale

RPE Zone HR Zone Description
0 Z1 Complete Rest
1 Z1 Very easy; light walking
2 Z1 Very easy; light walking
3 Z1 Very easy; walking
4 Z1 Still easy, maybe starting to sweat
5 Z2 Starting to work just a little and you can feel your HR rise
6 Z2 Upper Working but sustainable, able to talk in full sentences
7 Z3 Strong effort; breathing labored, but can still maintain pace for some minutes without slowing.
8 Z4 Olympic Distance Race Pace for MOP to FOP
9 Z5 10k effort – very hard
10 Z5+ Z5+ = 5k effort and Z5++ = cannot hold effort for more than a minute or two. (almost maximal effort)

Mike Ricci is a Level III USA Triathlon Certified Coach and has been coaching endurance athletes since 1989. Mike founded D3 in 2000, and has slowly added top-notch, USAT certified coaches each year to handle the demand for high quality triathlon coaching. In the past five years, D3 Coaches have coached hundreds of athletes to their first triathlon and hundreds more to become Ironman Finishers. In 2009, D3 was awarded the job of writing the training programs for the USA World Championship Teams for the seventh consecutive year. Mike also coaches the University of CO Triathlon Team, the 2010 and 2011 National Collegiate Champions.

 

by Mike Ricci, USAT Elite Coach
D3Multisport