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Top 10 Triathlon Tips

31 Mar , 2017  

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Morning Ride at Changi Coast Road

10 Jan , 2017  

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What is Zone 1 means in training? ano b yun?

19 Aug , 2016  

ironman aus age group sunset

Heart rate training can be confusing due to the many different types of terminology used and the many opinions on how we determine what our threshold zone is. Additionally, there are many different charts that give us a variety of ranges which adds to the confusion. This is an example of information overload, and to a beginner triathlete, this can seem incredibly confusing. My goal for this article is that you have a good understanding on how and why to test for heart rate zones, which training zones you should spend the most time in, and to make this a simple process.

All of the BT training plans were created with these heart rate zones in mind.

We’ll start with the definition of Training Zones:

A definition of Zone 1 is that it’s a super easy effort, probably a 4/10 on the Rate of Perceived Exertion (RPE) – see chart at end. It’s so easy that you should feel ‘guilty’ when you are done. You don’t think you went hard enough; it didn’t feel like a workout; you don’t think there was any benefit because it felt too easy, etc. If you have these types of thoughts after a Zone 1 workout, then congratulations, you are doing it right!

I call this the “Guilty Zone.”

A definition of Zone 2 is a bit more complicated, as it should feel pretty easy, at least in the beginning. But you should feel as though you have to work if you’ve been doing this several hours. You may even see cardiac drift towards the end of this workout. How easy is easy for Zone 2? I would recommend somewhere around 5-6/10 on the RPE scale. You should be able to hold a conversation for the duration of this workout, and I mean being able to talk in full sentences, not 1 or 2 word gasps.

This is what I call the “Conversation Zone.”

Zone 3 gets a little gray, and literally it is a ‘gray zone’. You typically aren’t going easy enough to get the benefits of a nice easy effort and you aren’t going hard enough to get the benefits of a ‘Race Pace’ type workout. This is an effort of about 7/10 on the RPE scale, and you can talk in one to two word answers.

I actually call this zone the NBZ – “No Benefit Zone.”

Zone 4 is your “Race Pace” zone – this is where you have burning legs and lungs and you can’t keep the effort up for much more than an hour. And yes, you have to be pretty fit to keep this effort up for an hour, but by definition, your threshold is an effort you can manage for one hour. You know when you are in Zone 4 as your breathing is labored, your arms and legs get very heavy and all you want to do is stop. This effort is 8-9+ on the RPE scale.

Zone 5 and up are for shorter efforts and these are usually 9+ to 10 type of efforts on the RPE scale. These efforts may last from a few seconds to maybe five or six minutes. This zone is beneficial if you are doing a lot of racing that has hard but very short efforts, such as bike racing or racing short events on the track in running.

Since this article is geared toward endurance athletes and our races our typically one hour or more, let’s understand how our training should be set up. Consider that a 400m race around the track that takes world class runners about 40 seconds to complete is around 86% aerobic. Now, if you are running a 5k, how much of that race do you think is aerobic? The answer is probably somewhere around 97-99%. For the average athlete the percentage of zone training for each zone should be roughly:

80-85% Zone 1 and Zone 2
10-15% Zone 4
2-5% of Zone 5
(For those of us you are training for half ironman distances and above there should be a percentage of Zone 3 training as well, but still that percentage may only 15-20% a week.)

The importance of Zone 1 and Zone 2 Training

Zone 1 and 2 training is important because the benefits of these workouts. You build endurance, durability and strength. In addition, these easy training sessions help build capillary pathways that transport oxygen to your muscles and carry waste (lactate) away from your muscles. The more capillary pathways that you can build, the more efficient you will be. Efficiency is equal to free speed.

If at first you can’t keep your HR under Zone 2, then you need to slow down. If that means you run for 3 minutes and walk for 2 minutes to keep your HR down then by all means do it. For a fit athlete getting back into training, I recommend not training with the heart rate monitor for 2 weeks and then put it on once you have a sense of fitness coming back. You may find that training in Zone 2 and under is a step back, but you will see the progress over time and will be thankful you were patient enough to try this.

Adaptation for everyone will be different. Some people will see changes right away, and for others it may take months. Just this year I had an athlete drop about 40 seconds a mile on his long runs after 2 months of Zone 2 training, and he’s been racing and training for over 20 years! So, at any level improvement is possible, but you need to have faith in the philosophy and above all else, be patient.

Determining your zones

Determining training zones is a simple process and I’ve written quite a bit on this before. If you are an experienced athlete you can use this method: http://www.beginnertriathlete.com/cms/article-detail.asp?articleid=633

For those of you who are new to training you might want to try this article: http://www.beginnertriathlete.com/cms/article-detail.asp?articleid=1243

In conclusion, it’s my hope you’ll follow the methods here in your training and see what great improvements training in Zone 1 and 2 will bring you.

RPE Scale

RPE Zone HR Zone Description
0 Z1 Complete Rest
1 Z1 Very easy; light walking
2 Z1 Very easy; light walking
3 Z1 Very easy; walking
4 Z1 Still easy, maybe starting to sweat
5 Z2 Starting to work just a little and you can feel your HR rise
6 Z2 Upper Working but sustainable, able to talk in full sentences
7 Z3 Strong effort; breathing labored, but can still maintain pace for some minutes without slowing.
8 Z4 Olympic Distance Race Pace for MOP to FOP
9 Z5 10k effort – very hard
10 Z5+ Z5+ = 5k effort and Z5++ = cannot hold effort for more than a minute or two. (almost maximal effort)

Mike Ricci is a Level III USA Triathlon Certified Coach and has been coaching endurance athletes since 1989. Mike founded D3 in 2000, and has slowly added top-notch, USAT certified coaches each year to handle the demand for high quality triathlon coaching. In the past five years, D3 Coaches have coached hundreds of athletes to their first triathlon and hundreds more to become Ironman Finishers. In 2009, D3 was awarded the job of writing the training programs for the USA World Championship Teams for the seventh consecutive year. Mike also coaches the University of CO Triathlon Team, the 2010 and 2011 National Collegiate Champions.

 

by Mike Ricci, USAT Elite Coach
D3Multisport

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Run Course in Triathlon

2 Jun , 2016  

 

CCP_7427.jpg

1. The depth of running talent is less than the depth of cycling talent in Ironman events.
This explanation is implausible on its face. There is no reason whatsoever to believe that Ironman events attract stronger cyclists than runners. The athletes who compete in Ironman events are by and large the same athletes who compete in shorter triathlon philippines, and run times are typically much more closely bunched together percentage-wise in shorter triathlons than in Ironman races.

2. Most triathletes go too hard on the bike in Ironman races and do not save enough energy for the run.
This explanation seems much more plausible than the first, but there is actually no good evidence that those athletes who produce the fastest run times in Ironman races hold back more on the bike than their fellow competitors. In fact, contrary to popular belief, elite Ironman triathletes triathlon philippines really don’t hold back at all on the bike. If riding at 80 or 90 percent of capacity (relative to the distance of 112 miles) were normal and necessary at the elite level of Ironman racing, then you would see at least one clown fly off the front and complete the bike leg 10 or 20 percent faster than the real contenders (which would translate to 30 to 60 minutes). Even if it were suicidal, people would still do it for a moment of glory. It’s human nature. But this never happens. Why? Because elite triathletes actually ride the Ironman triathlon philippines bike leg at something closer to 98 percent of their maximum capacity (meaning they would ride only five to 10 minutes faster in a pure 112-mile time trial).

Pacing is important, of course, but people don’t realize how great a difference there is between 98 percent and 100 percent efforts. To gain a better appreciation for the difference, go to the track and run 10K (25 laps) 2 percent slower than your 10K race pace. So, if your 10K time is 40:00, run a 40:48. I guarantee you will feel about 10 or 20 percent less miserable in the last lap at the slightly slower pace, which is why many elite Ironman racers think they are holding back 10 or 20 percent on the bike in competition when they are actually holding back 2 percent.

Riding too hard can affect subsequent run performance, but fitness trumps pacing. The less fit you are, the less your run will benefit from holding back on the bike. You could go 95, 90 or 85 percent on the bike and be shot for the marathon in any case. And the fitter you are, the less pacing matters. Craig Alexander would not run a 2:35 marathon in Hawaii instead of a 2:45 if he rode the bike leg in 4:55 instead of 4:37.

This observation leads us to the third and true explanation of the marathon meltdown phenomenon.

3. Most triathletes just aren’t well-trained enough to run a good Ironman marathon.

CCP_7450.jpg
You start the run fatigued no matter how you pace yourself on the bike. Those who hold it together and run well simply have better Ironman-specific fitness, which enables them to run closer to their ability level despite fatigue.

With this explanation in mind, use the following tips to avoid the all-too-common scenario of running poorly in the Ironman marathon.

 

from triathlon.competitor.com

 

Multisport,Training,Triathlon Philippines

Holiday ride at tagaytay

17 Jul , 2015  

Infinite multisport

In respect to our brother muslim eid al-fitr we celerate this day.

Infinite multisport

Infinite multisport

Bike ride manila going to tagaytay city

Training,Triathlon News,Triathlon Philippines

16-Week Ironman 70.3 Training Plan

22 May , 2015  

expo at harbor mall

CCP_3258

Building up to an Ironman 70.3 distance doesn’t need to be a chore. In fact, it can be quite a simple process that requires little more than physical exertion and a spot of dedication. Matt Fitzgerald outlines the reason for keeping your training plan simple, and gives a sample 16-week training plan.
By Matt Fitzgerald
Variety is overrated in triathlon training. It’s certainly important, but coaches often make it out to be more important than repetition when the opposite is true. There are only a handful of workout types that you need to include in your training program. You can practice these basic types of workouts in all kinds of different ways, and doing so may make the training process more interesting for you, but there is no particular physiological advantage of complex training compared to basic training.

I favor simple training plans for a few reasons. First, I find them to be less mentally stressful than complex training plans. Why make your training so complex that it is unnecessarily mentally taxing in addition to being necessarily physically taxing? Second, the results of a very basic, and highly repetitive, training plan are predictable, and predictability of effects is a major virtue in a training plan. You want to know exactly what you’re going to get out of it. When your workouts are always familiar, there’s little mystery about what they will do for you. Finally, it’s easier to measure and monitor progress in a training plan with lots of repetition. You can make apples-to-apples comparisons of your performance in difference instances of the same workout, whereas such comparisons are more difficult when you never do the same workout twice. This is important, because seeing progress inspires future progress.

Of course, a training plan has to have some variation. First, the overall workload has to increase as it goes along. Second, the key workouts must become more race-specific. The following is a super simple 16-week training plan for half-iron-distance racing. It features nine workouts per week—three swims, three rides, and three runs—and is appropriate for “intermediate” level athletes.

You will find the workout descriptions self-explanatory for the most part, but the intensity and pacing guidelines require some explanation. Here’s a key to understanding them:
CCP_3290

5K race pace = An effort performed at approximately the fastest pace you could sustain in a 5K running race.
10K race pace = An effort performed at approximately the fastest pace you could sustain in a 10K running race.
Comfortably hard = An effort that is right on the threshold of making you really suffer.
Easy = A very comfortable effort, deliberately slower than your natural pace in swimming, cycling or running.
Hard = An effort that is very challenging but not maximal for the prescribed duration (such that a two-minute hard effort is performed at a slightly faster pace than a three-minute hard effort).
Jog = Very slow running.
Moderate = An effort that feels comfortable but not dawdling.
Race pace = An effort performed at your anticipated half-iron-distance race pace.
Sprint = A 100 percent maximal effort.
Time trial = A maximal effort relative to the prescribed distance.

Week 1
Monday: Rest.
Tuesday: Bike 40 minutes moderate with 4 x 30-second sprints scattered.
Wednesday: Swim 800 yards total. Main set: 8 x 25 yards, rest interval (RI) = 20 seconds. | Run 4 miles moderate + 2 x 10-second hill sprints.
Thursday: Bike 40 minutes moderate.
Friday: Swim 800 yards total. Main set: 3 x 100 yards race pace, RI = 15 seconds. | Run 4 miles moderate.
Saturday: Bike 20 miles moderate.
Sunday: Run 6 miles moderate. | Swim 800 yards moderate.

Week 2
Monday: Rest.
Tuesday: Bike 40 minutes moderate with 6 x 30-second sprints scattered.
Wednesday: Swim 850 yards total. Main set: 10 x 25 sprints, RI = 20 seconds. | Run 4 miles moderate + 4 x 10-second hill sprints.
Thursday: Bike 40 minutes moderate + 5 minutes comfortably hard.
Friday: Swim 850 yards total. Main set: 4 x 100 yards race pace, RI = 15 seconds. | Run 4 miles moderate.
Saturday: Bike 25 miles moderate.
Sunday: Run 7 miles moderate. | Swim 1,000 yards moderate.

CCP_3287

Week 3
Monday: Rest.
Tuesday: Bike 40 minutes with 8 x 30-second sprints scattered.
Wednesday: Swim 900 yards total. Main set: 12 x 25 sprints, RI = 20 seconds. | Run 4 miles moderate + 6 x 10-second hill sprints.
Thursday: Bike 40 minutes moderate + 8 minutes comfortably hard.
Friday: Swim 900 yards total. Main set: 3 x 200 yards race pace, RI = 15 seconds. | Run 4.5 miles moderate.
Saturday: Bike 30 miles moderate.
Sunday: Run 8 miles moderate. | Swim 1,200 yards moderate.

Week 4 (Recovery)
Monday: Rest.
Tuesday: Bike 40 minutes with 6 x 30-second sprints scattered.
Wednesday: Swim 800 yards total. Main set: 8 x 25 sprints, RI = 20 seconds. | Run 4 miles moderate + 4 x 10-second hill sprints.
Thursday: Bike 40 minutes moderate + 5 minutes comfortably hard.
Friday: Swim 800 yards total. Main set: 3 x 100 yards race pace, RI = 15 seconds. | Run 4 miles moderate.
Saturday: Bike 25 miles moderate.
Sunday: Run 7 miles moderate. | Swim 1,000 yards moderate.

Week 5
Monday: Rest.
Tuesday: Bike 45 minutes with 8 x 1-minute hard efforts scattered.
Wednesday: Swim 1,000 yards total. Main set: 6 x 50 sprints, RI = 20 seconds. | Run 4.5 miles with 6 x 30-second hard efforts scattered.
Thursday: Bike 40 minutes moderate + 8 minutes comfortably hard.
Friday: Swim 1,000 yards total. Main set: 2 x 200 yards race pace, RI = 30 seconds. | Run 4.5 miles moderate + 4 x 10-sec. hill sprints.
Saturday: Bike 35 miles moderate + 10-minute transition run at moderate pace.
Sunday: Run 9 miles moderate. | Swim 1,400 yards moderate.

Week 6
Monday: Rest.
Tuesday: Bike 45 minutes with 6 x 2-minute hard efforts scattered.
Wednesday: Swim 1,100 yards total. Main set: 8 x 50 sprints, RI = 20 seconds. | Run 4.5 miles with 6 x 45-second hard efforts scattered.
Thursday: Bike 40 minutes moderate + 10 minutes comfortably hard.
Friday: Swim 1,100 yards total. Main set: 3 x 200 yards race pace, RI = 30 seconds. | Run 4.5 miles moderate + 4 x 10-second hill sprints.
Saturday: Bike 40 miles moderate.
Sunday: Run 10 miles moderate. | Swim 1,600 yards total. Main set: 1,000 yard time trial.

Week 7
Monday: Rest.
Tuesday: Bike 45 minutes with 4 x 3-minute hard efforts scattered.
Wednesday: Swim 1,200 yards total. Main set: 10 x 50 sprints, RI = 20 seconds. | Run 4.5 miles with 6 x 1-minute hard efforts scattered.
Thursday: Bike 40 minutes moderate + 12 minutes comfortably hard.
Friday: Swim 1,200 yards total. Main set: 3 x 200 yards race pace, RI = 20 seconds. | Run 5 miles moderate + 4 x 10-second hill sprints.
Saturday: Bike 45 miles moderate + 15-minute transition run at moderate pace.
Sunday: Run 11 miles moderate. | Swim 1,800 yards moderate.

Week 8 (Recovery)
Monday: Rest.
Tuesday: Bike 40 minutes with 6 x 1-minute hard efforts scattered.
Wednesday: Swim 1,000 yards total. Main set: 8 x 50 sprints, RI = 20 seconds. | Run 4.5 miles with 6 x 30-second hard efforts scattered.
Thursday: Bike 40 minutes moderate + 8 minutes comfortably hard.
Friday: Swim 1,000 yards total. Main set: 2 x 200 yards race pace, RI = 20 seconds. | Run 4 miles moderate.
Saturday: Bike 35 miles moderate.
Sunday: Run 9 miles moderate. | Swim 1,400 yards moderate.

Week 9
Monday: Rest.
Tuesday: Bike 50 minutes with 6 x 2-minute hard efforts scattered.
Wednesday: Swim 1,300 yards total. Main set: 6 x 75 sprints, RI = 20 seconds. | Run 1 mile easy, 8 x 600m at 5K race pace with 400m jog recoveries, 1 mile easy.
Thursday: Bike 40 minutes moderate + 15 minutes comfortably hard.
Friday: Swim 1,300 yards total. Main set: 2 x 300 yards race pace, RI = 30 seconds. | Run 5 miles moderate + 4 x 10-second hill sprints.
Saturday: Bike 50 miles moderate + 20-minute transition run at moderate pace.
Sunday: Run 12 miles moderate. | Swim 2,000 yards moderate.

Week 10
Monday: Rest.
Tuesday: Bike 50 minutes with 5 x 3-minute hard efforts scattered.
Wednesday: Swim 1,400 yards total. Main set: 8 x 75 sprints, RI = 20 seconds. | Run 1 mile easy, 6 x 800m at 5K race pace with 400m jog recoveries, 1 mile easy.
Thursday: Bike 40 minutes moderate + 18 minutes comfortably hard.
Friday: Swim 1,400 yards total. Main set: 2 x 300 yards race pace, RI = 20 seconds. | Run 5.5 miles moderate + 4 x 10-second hill sprints.
Saturday: Bike 55 miles moderate.
Sunday: Run 13 miles moderate. | Swim 2,000 yards total. Main set: 1,500 time trial.

Week 11
Monday: Rest.
Tuesday: Bike 55 minutes with 4 x 4-minute hard efforts scattered.
Wednesday: Swim 1,500 yards total. Main set: 10 x 75 sprints, RI = 20 seconds. | Run 1 mile easy, 5 x 1,000m at 5K race pace with 400m jog recoveries, 1 mile easy.
Thursday: Bike 40 minutes moderate + 20 minutes comfortably hard.
Friday: Swim 1,500 yards total. Main set: 3 x 300 yards race pace, RI = 30 seconds. | Run 6 miles moderate + 4 x 10-second hill sprints.
Saturday: Bike 60 miles moderate + 10-minute transition run at race pace.
Sunday: Run 14 miles moderate. | Swim 2,200 yards moderate.

Week 12 (Recovery)
Monday: Rest.
Tuesday: Bike 45 minutes with 5 x 2-minute hard efforts scattered.
Wednesday: Swim 1,300 yards total. Main set: 6 x 75 sprints, RI = 20 seconds. Run 2 miles easy, 1 miles at 10K race pace, 2 miles easy.
Thursday: Bike 40 minutes moderate + 10 minutes comfortably hard.
Friday: Swim 1,300 yards total. Main set: 2 x 300 yards race pace, RI = 30 seconds. | Run 5 miles moderate.
Saturday: Bike 45 miles moderate.
Sunday: Run 10 miles moderate. | Swim 2,000 yards moderate.

Week 13
Monday: Rest.
Tuesday: Bike 20 minutes easy, 20 minutes comfortably hard, 20 minutes easy.
Wednesday: Swim 1,600 yards total. Main set: 6 x 100 sprints, RI = 20 seconds. | Run 2 miles easy, 2 miles at 10K race pace, 2 miles easy.
Thursday: Bike 45 minutes with 5 x 2-minute hard efforts scattered.
Friday: Swim 1,600 yards total. Main set: 2 x 400 yards race pace, RI = 30 seconds. | Run 6 miles moderate + 4 x 10-second hill sprints.
Saturday: Bike 50 miles moderate + 10 miles race pace + 15-minute transition run at race pace.
Sunday: Run 10 miles moderate + 2 miles race pace. | Swim 2,200 yards total. Main set: 500 yards race pace.

Week 14
Monday: Rest.
Tuesday: Bike 20 minutes easy, 25 minutes comfortably hard, 15 minutes easy.
Wednesday: Swim 1,800 yards total. Main set: 8 x 100 sprints, RI = 20 seconds. | Run 2 miles easy, 3 miles at 10K race pace, 2 miles easy.
Thursday: Bike 45 minutes with 4 x 3-minute hard efforts scattered.
Friday: Swim 1,600 yards total. Main set: 2 x 400 yards race pace, RI = 20 seconds. | Run 6 miles moderate + 4 x 10-second hill sprints.
Saturday: Bike 45 miles moderate + 15 miles race pace + 20-minute transition run at race pace.
Sunday: Run 12 miles moderate + 2 miles race pace. | Swim 2,400 yards total. Main set: 600 yards race pace.

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Week 15
Monday: Rest.
Tuesday: Bike 15 minutes easy, 30 minutes comfortably hard, 15 minutes easy.
Wednesday: Swim 2,000 yards total. Main set: 10 x 100 sprints, RI = 20 seconds. | Run 2 miles easy, 3 miles at 10K race pace, 2 miles easy.
Thursday: Bike 45 minutes with 8 x 1-minute hard efforts scattered.
Friday: Swim 1,600 yards total. Main set: 2 x 400 yards race pace, RI = 30 seconds. | Run 4.5 miles moderate + 4 x 10-second hill sprints.
Saturday: Bike 40 miles moderate + 10 miles race pace + 10-minute transition run at race pace.
Sunday: Run 12 miles moderate + 2 miles race pace (beat last week’s time). | Swim 2,400 yards total. Main set: 600 yards race pace (beat last week’s time).

Week 16
Monday: Rest.
Tuesday: Bike 10 minutes easy, 10 minutes comfortably hard, 10 minutes easy.
Wednesday: Swim 1,300 yards total. Main set: 5 x 100 sprints, RI = 20 seconds. | Run 2 miles easy, 1 mile at 10K race pace, 2 miles easy.
Thursday: Bike 45 minutes with 5 x 30-second sprints scattered.
Friday: Swim 800 yards total. Main set: 400 yards race pace. | Run 3 miles easy.
Saturday: Swim 10 minutes easy with 4 x 30 seconds at race pace. | Bike 10 minutes with 4 x 30 seconds fast. | Run 10 minutes with 4 x 20 seconds at 90 percent effort.
Sunday: RACE!
Read more at http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2010/09/08/simple-16week-ironman-703-training-plan#oszPQEQW94xtjddF.99

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List all you need in Triathlon

4 Dec , 2014  

triathlon

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TRI UNITED 4 CLARK FONTANA

4 Aug , 2014  

EVENT DETAILS

DATE: November 23, 2014, Sunday
VENUE: Fontana Leisure Park, Clark, Pampanga
RACE DISTANCES:
  • Sprint  : 600m Swim/ 30Km Bike/ 5Km Run
  • Relay:  600m Swim/ 30Km Bike/ 5Km Run
  • Teens (15 to 17) :  600m Swim/ 15km Bike/ 5km Run
  • Teens (13 to 14) :  300m Swim/ 15km Bike/ 2.5km Run
DISTANCE Up to Aug 15 Up to Aug 31 Up to Sept 15 Up to Oct 15
Sprint & Teens P1,500 P2,000 P2,500 P3,000
Relay P3,000 P3,500 P4,000 P4,500
REMINDERS:
  • Deadline for registration is on October 15 or until slots last.
  • Deadline for registration subject to change depending on slot availability.
  • Registration fees are non-transferable by may be cancelled with refund. Check refund policy.
Refund Policy:
Athletes confirmed in the race who wish to withdraw, must do so in writing to the race office.
Email: registration@bikekingphilippines.com
It is the athlete’s responsibility to ensure the race office has received any communication. Upon confirmation of this request, athletes are eligible for a partial refund as follows:
  • Any requests received before October 15, 2014 will be eligible for a refund of 50%.
  • Any requests received after October 15, 2014 will be eligible for partial refund IF there is a registration wait list. Contact the race office should there be a wait list.
If you do not receive a response from the race office within 5 days from request, it should be assumed that it has not been received and you should contact us by phone.

Online registration link: www.bikekingphilippines.com

SCHEDULE OF ACTIVITIES:
DATE TIME ACTIVITY GENDER AGE GROUP WAVE
Sunday
November 23, 2014
5:00 AM Transition Area Opens
START OF RACE 
6:00 AM Teens Female 13-14/15-17 1
6:10 AM Teens Male 13-14/15-17 2
6:20 AM Sprint Female 18-24 3
6:20 AM Sprint Male 18-24 3
6:30 AM Sprint Female 25-29 4
6:40 AM Sprint Male 25-29 5
6:50 AM Sprint Female 30-34 6
7:00 AM Sprint Male 30-34  7
7:10 AM Sprint Male 30-34  8
7:20 AM Sprint Female 35-39 9
7:30 AM Sprint Male 50-55 10
7:30 AM Sprint Male 55-Above 10
7:40 AM Team Competition Mix 11
7:50 AM Sprint Female 40-44 12
8:00 AM Sprint Male 40-44  13
8:10 AM Sprint Female 45-Above 14
8:20 AM Sprint Male 45-49 15
8:30 AM Relay Mix 16
8:40 AM Sprint Male 35-39  17
8:50 AM Sprint Male 35-39  18
Starting time may change depending on the number of entries
11:30 AM AWARDING
AWARD/ PRIZES:
All Top 3 Male and Female category winners will receive MEDALS and GIFTPACKS:
CATEGORY:
  • Sprint Distance – Adult
    • Male Age Group (18-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-Above)
    • Female Age Group (18-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-Above)
  • Sprint Distance – Teens
    • Teen  Male Age Group (15-17)
    • Teen Female Age Group (15-17)
    • Teen Male Age Group (13 – 14)
    • Teen Female Age Group (13 – 14)
  • Relay
    • Open category
RACE INCLUSIONS:
  • Swimming Cap/ Timing Chip/ Race Bib/ Bike & Helmet Sticker
  • Event Shirt/ Race Belt/ Finisher’s Medal
  • Unilab Active Health Token/ Post Race Meal

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1st LAKAN TRI AQUATHLON BULACAN 2014

23 Jun , 2014  

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OPEN WATER TRAINING SESSIONS AT PLAYA LAIYA

28 May , 2014  

Open water training sessions at Playa Laiya
Open water training sessions at Playa Laiya

Open water training sessions at Playa Laiya