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Triathlon Training Tips

23 Jul , 2017  

riptide singapore
1. Train alone

When I first started my career in triathlon, I got to a certain level by training with my buddies, in groups and non-structured environments. I then left for a while and came back with a whole new attitude. I found a coach I liked and really appreciated his ideas. So I committed myself to the training. I rarely trained with people. Eighty-five to 90 percent of the training I did alone, which worked for me. So if I were climbing a hill and my heart rate spiked, I’d walk up the hill. This created self-confidence. I came out and won my first race by training alone, which was Wildflower, a tough course.

riptide

2. Do drills

People neglect cycling and running drills. I did them. So on race day I would lose as little fitness as possible. I could be more efficient, not really falling apart halfway through the marathon because of the training drills. The reality is you should be doing drills all the time, year in and year out. I was different than a lot of pros by doing that.

riptide
3. Train for a race

Don’t train for general fitness. I think I was one of the first to train on the Big Island. I trained in the heat and learned the currents of the water. When I did Wildflower, I’d incorporate rides and runs similar to that course. I found out the course had lots of trails and hills, so I thought, okay, I need to run hills and train specific to that course.

4. Put yourself in pain

This one is kind of sadistic. I always had this problem of my stomach shutting down during the marathon of an Ironman. So I thought if I could run with my stomach shutting down, I could do it in a race. So once a week I would sit down and eat nachos with really spicy hot sauce. Then I’d get my running gear on, go for a run and of course, my stomach would shut down, but I’d just keep going. They were brutal training runs. But then on race day, when my stomach would shut down I’d think, “I can deal with this.” I’d be able to keep going. Doing this paid off so many times over. I’d do this 10 weeks out from Ironman until two weeks before race day. It’d be a horrible run, but it had a huge impact on my overall race performance.

5. Spend the dough

I see this with a lot of age-groupers. They spend so much time and effort training for an Ironman and they don’t bother to get new tires or get a tune-up. Get new tires. Get a new chain if you need it. You’ve invested so much time, just pay the couple of extra bucks. Don’t cheap out. It’s worth the extra expense.

6. Get out of shape

I got this piece of advice from Paula Newby-Fraser and it was one of the best things I have heard. She told me, “Peter, you can have a great short career or you can have a great long career. But you need to take time to leave the sport behind you.” Basically, you need to get out of shape to get back into shape. You need to physically and mentally recharge. You need to become a non-athlete. Don’t eat healthy. It hurts your fitness, sure, but it makes for a better long-term career. Mark Allen did this and it worked for him. Doing this prepares your body for another season. It was so easy for me to do this because two legends told me they did it. It felt like a part of the puzzle of being pro.

7. Don’t workout when sick

I see so many athletes tinker with their workouts when they are sick. Don’t. Take the day off.

BMC singapore

8. Know your body

If you head out the door and your knee hurts, don’t push through it because then all of a sudden you’re injured and you are out. Stop exercising and take a couple of days off rather than be out a couple of weeks.

tips from www.triathlete.com

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How To Fix A Bike Puncture – Repairing An Inner Tube

4 Jul , 2017  

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Ironman Performance – The Mini Taper Triathlon Philippines

13 Apr , 2017  

by Coach Alun Woodward, Ironguides Coach
 
Finally winter is coming to an end and the race season is rapidly approaching with a sprinkling of early season events already taking place. After months of hard training its exciting to finally get an opportunity to race and test your fitness.
When we are training hard we never really get to see our true fitness as its often hiding under a blanket of fatigue. It can be frustrating to train hard and not really see the progress taking place or feeling like every day is a struggle to get the work done, almost feeling unfit every day when in fact the complete opposite is true. When training for performance the reality is the only time we really see our true fitness and feel fit is race day! This level of fatigue in training is good and drives gains in fitness but when we want to test the fitness we do need to allow this fatigue to lift a little just to get a glimpse of the gains that have been made.
I see a lot of athletes take a full taper into their first events and often have amazing races then performance just trails off through the season as they repeatedly follow this taper process into every event as it worked so well the first time. The reason this happens is a full taper will bring the body to a peak of fitness and then from that point the only way is down, also the peak is related to the period of training banked before the taper, so tapering for every event from this point might mean only 2-3 weeks of training banked compared to maybe the 3-4 months before the first race.
Ideally we should be looking to taper just 1-2 times per year and for other races we simply train straight through using them as a training session or perform a mini taper or more a refresh of the system before the event.
While a full taper might be anywhere from 10 days to 2 weeks long before your big race a mini taper needs to be just 2-3 days long and will not allow full recovery but it will give your body a little rest and give you more fire power for race day without effecting your training progression.
So a mini taper will tend to start around Thursday to Friday of race week given Sunday is your race day. I do like to put one very easy day into this where you may get out for a easy 20min bike session just to keep the body moving but this day is about doing as little as possible. On the other days training should resemble your regular plan in terms of what systems your training but with reduced volume.
THURSDAY
3 full days out from the race is a great time to have a very easy day, looking to do as little as possible on the day or even take a full rest day. I always prefer to take this day to start the mini taper and then train for 2-3 days into the event.
A simple 20min run is enough on this day but its important that you eat as normal on this day – the lack or training and regular eating protocol will lead to some carbo loading effect for race day.
FRIDAY
Friday i like to have fairly similar to your regular training day in terms of structure but maybe take a little of the volume out of the overall program. Lets say on this day you normally have a morning swim and evening ride, we want to hit both sessions and make sure that the same stimulus from the session is hit but without the same fatigue, below are examples of how we can do this
Regular swim main set – 16x100m hard on 2minutes with last 8 repeats using paddles
Adapted Main set – 16x50m hard on 60s – last 8 repeat with paddles
So we are swimming the same speed so the body does not miss out on the speed stimulus but the interval is only half of normal so we are not going to be producing the same levels of fatigue.
The same idea can be applied to any session, below if an example of a bike session
Regular bike set – 8x40s all out sprints with 3minutes easy recovery between
Adapted bike set – 8min @ 20s all out / 40s rest
This main set is much shorter but the 20s all out efforts will see the legs still get the speed and power stimulus but not the same amount of damage that would occur in a 40s sprint – also the short recoveries between sprints stop the athlete being able to push too hard on the 20s sprints to lead to muscle damage.
SATURDAY
In a mini taper i like to use the day before the race for some easy aerobic volume, the volume here is very individual and depends on your regular training volume and also i find female athletes perform very well of more volume on the day before a race when compared with male athletes.
For example a female athlete who regularly trains 16 hours a week might do an easy 4 hour ride on this day, time in the saddle being the focus not distance as i like this ride to be very easy so speed is going to be low. If we look at a female athlete training 12 hours per week then this ride would be maximum 3 hour long so staying at 25% of the weekly volume.
For male athletes this bike session would be a lot shorter topping out at 90min for athletes typically training up to 16 hours a week and looking towards 2.5-3hours for athletes training over this amount per week.
SUNDAY – RACE DAY
Race day should be treated as any race day, so aim to be awake at least 3 hours before your race start time in order to fully wake your body up before the start. Starting your day with a easy 10min jog before breakfast is a great way to accelerate this process and make sure your ready to go when the race starts.
MONDAY – Back to work
Once race day is done then its time to get back to training, yes you will be carrying some fatigue from the race but in general race day is less volume and easier than a training day on your body so you should be fine to jump straight back to your regular program. A well structured program should see Monday as a recovery day from a weekend of longer endurance work so this is not different and you should be all systems go by the time harder work commences on the Tuesday.
A mini taper is a great way to allow you a glimpse of your true fitness without compromising your training and progression towards your big races of the year. This is also a great way to boost confidence as you head into another block of hard training which will no doubt once again lead to performance levels hiding under that blanket of fatigue.
Enjoy your training.
from http://www.asiatri.com

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Fight Cancer

3 Jan , 2017  

velo fight cancer

velo fight cancer

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10 Common Bicycle Fitting Myths

7 Dec , 2016  

Over the years, I have heard my share of bicycle fitting myths. It’s hard not to be succumbed to them with the internet hosting blogs and videos on ‘how to fit your bike’ by any person out there. By understanding these misconceptions about bike fitting, you can learn how to avoid things that could be hampering your progress as a cyclist. You’ll also understand the process and science behind bicycle fitting and its value to you, regardless of your riding ability.
MYTH 1: I ONLY NEED A BIKE FIT IF MY POSITION IS VERY UNCOMFORTABLE OR IF I HAVE JUST PURCHASED A NEW BIKE

Bike fitting is an ongoing process. Your body is always changing from its fitness, flexibility, weight, and strength. It’s recommended to get a fit at least once a year. If you have just purchased a new bike, or have recovered from an injury or surgery, a bike fit is very important in optimizing your performance on the bike.
MYTH 2: IT DOESN’T WORK. I HAVE ALREADY RECEIVED A FIT BEFORE (FROM MANY DIFFERENT PEOPLE) AND IT DIDN’T HELP

It’s important to understand that the term ‘bike fit’ is used in many different contexts, as there are several different philosophies of fit and levels of fitting expertise. Some bike shops may advertise a ‘bike fit’, but are only offering a few minor adjustments, or the person performing the fit was never professionally trained. The FASTER Fit Lab represents the best fitting methodology in the world with our 2-Dimensional and 3-Dimensional camera systems and fitting expertise. By improving your biomechanics, we work to make you more efficient, more comfortable, and faster on your bike. The FASTER fit is a very in-depth service that takes 2 to 3 hours and involves: an interview on your medical history, flexibility testing, range of motion, and then spinning on the bike as we analyze your biomechanics and make adjustments to the bike and your position. After 30 days, we bring you back into the FASTER Fit Lab for a follow up fit (at no additional charge), to make any additional changes to your bike based upon how you have adjusted to the fit in your riding.
MYTH 3: I HAVE A BIG TRIATHLON EVENT COMING UP AND I DON’T WANT TO GET A FIT NOW BECAUSE THOSE CHANGES MIGHT BE DRAMATIC AND COULD AFFECT MY PERFORMANCE

When you have an event coming up, we work with you to ensure that the proper adjustments are made to make you more efficient on your bike without making major changes. The FASTER Fit includes a 30-day follow-up, which we would schedule with you for before your event, and use that time to make any major adjustments that may be necessary. That way, you will be more efficient for your event, and still get in the necessary fit adjustments to make an overall long term impact on your riding.
MYTH 4: I HAVE TRIED MANY DIFFERENT CUSTOM INSOLES FOR MY FEET, BUT KEEP GETTING NUMBNESS/TINGLING, HOT FEET, AND DISCOMFORT. MAYBE I HAVEN’T FOUND THE PERFECT INSOLES…

We’ve heard this many times from people and have always addressed this issue in the FASTER Fit lab. Issues with your feet usually result from improper cleat placement, saddle placement, and other adjustments on the bike. During the FASTER Fit, we spend a great deal of time working with your feet to make sure your feet are not only comfortable but to improve your overall efficiency on the bike.
MYTH 5: IF I LOWER MY STEM AND GET AS LOW AS POSSIBLE, IT WILL MAKE ME MORE AERO

Being hunched over in what people typically think of as an ‘aero’ position could be hindering your performance. There is a scientific formula for what angle your hips can be in before you lose power on the bike. Think about crimping a hose and the water not coming out. This is what you can do to your power on the bike by putting yourself in this position. During a recent experiment in the FASTER Wind Tunnel, Melissa experimented with lowering her stem on a Cervelo P3 time trial bike. After the test, we found her to not only be less aero, but she was extremely uncomfortable in this position.
MYTH 6: MY LOWER BACK IS BOTHERING ME, SO I PROBABLY NEED TO RAISE MY HANDLEBARS

We have often seen people make adjustments to their bike based on ‘symptoms’ and have not only aggravated those symptoms, but created new issues. Raising the handlebars does seem logical, but in some circumstances, can actually create more pressure in your lower back. If you are currently experiencing these symptoms, be sure to contact us directly and get proper advice.
MYTH 7: MY HANDS KEEP GOING NUMB. MAYBE IT’S EITHER MY GLOVES OR I’M GETTING OLD

Your hands are full of many nerves and unfortunately, cycling puts a lot of pressure on these nerves. Sometimes using padded gloves can help alleviate pressure on these nerves and reduce the numbness in your hands, but many times, this is caused by a fitting issue. A proper fit reduces the amount of pressure that is put on your arms. During a fit, we may adjust the distance and height your handlebars are from your body. We may also pick a new handlebar to improve your fit, as they come in many sizes and shapes (round or more flat).
MYTH 8: I NEED TO BUY A BIKE FIRST, AND THEN GET FIT TO THE BIKE

You can do it in this order, however at FASTER, we recommend getting a fit first, and taking your fit measurements to find your perfect new bike. Bikes have many different geometries between brands, and even models within a brand. Depending on your riding style, flexibility, goals, and fit measurements, we can help narrow down which options would work best for you and your budget.
MYTH 9: BIKE FITTING IS EXPENSIVE

We’ll admit, cycling isn’t a cheap sport. However, when you consider the costs of a new bike, wheels, or clothing, a bike fit is a minimal investment. At FASTER, we offer two levels of fitting: a 2D/3D fit for $299.99 and a Medical fit for $499.99. We also offer a 3D Speed Lab Fitting for $749.99 which involves a 2D/3D fit and an hour in our wind tunnel. This is for athletes who want to be completely optimized, where power output and respiration rate will be evaluated while aerodynamic drag is also measured. Investing in a fit can also prevent future costs of getting injured or not riding your bike because it was too uncomfortable.
MYTH 10: I ONLY GET DISCOMFORT WHEN I GO LONGER DISTANCES ON MY BIKE… SHOULD I JUST RIDE SHORTER DISTANCES FROM NOW ON?

Riding longer distances should be enjoyable yet challenging. A proper bike fit will ensure that no matter the distance you are riding, you are optimized in comfort and performance. You never have to resort to shorter distances on your bike rides, unless you absolutely want to.

 

article from thetrihub

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What is Drafting in triathlon?

25 Oct , 2016  

please watch

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List all you need in Triathlon

4 Dec , 2014  

triathlon

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News: Schwalbe presents the final Procore-System for 2015

28 Aug , 2014  

Massive grip and high protection against punctures. – This is what Schwalbe promises. The Schwalbe Procore system proved itself able to handle the pressure on the race cicuit over the last couple of weeks. Nico Lau won the Enduro World Series races in Scotland and Sam Hill, the last Downhill Worldcup in Meribel, both riding procore.

There have been rumors about the new Schwalbe Procore system. But it is already clear that the system carries two air chambers. One evening after demo-day, Schwalbe revealed the new system, and it was immediately obvious they had made some new clever changes. Initially prototype versions had two valves, requiring modification to the rims, but Shwalbe presented the system with just one valve. Additionally, there have been some changes to their range of tyres too.

 

Massive grip and high protection against punctures. – This is what Schwalbe promises.  The Schwalbe Procore system proved itself able to handle the pressure on the race cicuit over the last couple of weeks. Nico Lau won the Enduro World Series races in Scotland and Sam Hill, the last Downhill Worldcup in Meribel, both riding procore.

Massive grip and high protection against punctures. – This is what Schwalbe promises.
The Schwalbe Procore system proved itself able to handle the pressure on the race cicuit over the last couple of weeks. Nico Lau won the Enduro World Series races in Scotland and Sam Hill, the last Downhill Worldcup in Meribel, both riding procore.

 

Massive grip and high protection against punctures. – This is what Schwalbe promises.

The Schwalbe Procore system proved itself able to handle the pressure on the race cicuit over the last couple of weeks. Nico Lau won the Enduro World Series races in Scotland and Sam Hill, the last Downhill Worldcup in Meribel, both riding procore.

 

Massive grip and high protection against punctures. – This is what Schwalbe promises.  The Schwalbe Procore system proved itself able to handle the pressure on the race cicuit over the last couple of weeks. Nico Lau won the Enduro World Series races in Scotland and Sam Hill, the last Downhill Worldcup in Meribel, both riding procore.

Massive grip and high protection against punctures. – This is what Schwalbe promises.
The Schwalbe Procore system proved itself able to handle the pressure on the race cicuit over the last couple of weeks. Nico Lau won the Enduro World Series races in Scotland and Sam Hill, the last Downhill Worldcup in Meribel, both riding procore.

Massive grip and high protection against punctures. – This is what Schwalbe promises.  The Schwalbe Procore system proved itself able to handle the pressure on the race cicuit over the last couple of weeks. Nico Lau won the Enduro World Series races in Scotland and Sam Hill, the last Downhill Worldcup in Meribel, both riding procore.

Massive grip and high protection against punctures. – This is what Schwalbe promises.
The Schwalbe Procore system proved itself able to handle the pressure on the race cicuit over the last couple of weeks. Nico Lau won the Enduro World Series races in Scotland and Sam Hill, the last Downhill Worldcup in Meribel, both riding procore.

Multisports,Race Result,Races,Tips and tricks,Training,Triathlon

TRI UNITED 4 CLARK FONTANA

4 Aug , 2014  

EVENT DETAILS

DATE: November 23, 2014, Sunday
VENUE: Fontana Leisure Park, Clark, Pampanga
RACE DISTANCES:
  • Sprint  : 600m Swim/ 30Km Bike/ 5Km Run
  • Relay:  600m Swim/ 30Km Bike/ 5Km Run
  • Teens (15 to 17) :  600m Swim/ 15km Bike/ 5km Run
  • Teens (13 to 14) :  300m Swim/ 15km Bike/ 2.5km Run
DISTANCE Up to Aug 15 Up to Aug 31 Up to Sept 15 Up to Oct 15
Sprint & Teens P1,500 P2,000 P2,500 P3,000
Relay P3,000 P3,500 P4,000 P4,500
REMINDERS:
  • Deadline for registration is on October 15 or until slots last.
  • Deadline for registration subject to change depending on slot availability.
  • Registration fees are non-transferable by may be cancelled with refund. Check refund policy.
Refund Policy:
Athletes confirmed in the race who wish to withdraw, must do so in writing to the race office.
Email: registration@bikekingphilippines.com
It is the athlete’s responsibility to ensure the race office has received any communication. Upon confirmation of this request, athletes are eligible for a partial refund as follows:
  • Any requests received before October 15, 2014 will be eligible for a refund of 50%.
  • Any requests received after October 15, 2014 will be eligible for partial refund IF there is a registration wait list. Contact the race office should there be a wait list.
If you do not receive a response from the race office within 5 days from request, it should be assumed that it has not been received and you should contact us by phone.

Online registration link: www.bikekingphilippines.com

SCHEDULE OF ACTIVITIES:
DATE TIME ACTIVITY GENDER AGE GROUP WAVE
Sunday
November 23, 2014
5:00 AM Transition Area Opens
START OF RACE 
6:00 AM Teens Female 13-14/15-17 1
6:10 AM Teens Male 13-14/15-17 2
6:20 AM Sprint Female 18-24 3
6:20 AM Sprint Male 18-24 3
6:30 AM Sprint Female 25-29 4
6:40 AM Sprint Male 25-29 5
6:50 AM Sprint Female 30-34 6
7:00 AM Sprint Male 30-34  7
7:10 AM Sprint Male 30-34  8
7:20 AM Sprint Female 35-39 9
7:30 AM Sprint Male 50-55 10
7:30 AM Sprint Male 55-Above 10
7:40 AM Team Competition Mix 11
7:50 AM Sprint Female 40-44 12
8:00 AM Sprint Male 40-44  13
8:10 AM Sprint Female 45-Above 14
8:20 AM Sprint Male 45-49 15
8:30 AM Relay Mix 16
8:40 AM Sprint Male 35-39  17
8:50 AM Sprint Male 35-39  18
Starting time may change depending on the number of entries
11:30 AM AWARDING
AWARD/ PRIZES:
All Top 3 Male and Female category winners will receive MEDALS and GIFTPACKS:
CATEGORY:
  • Sprint Distance – Adult
    • Male Age Group (18-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-Above)
    • Female Age Group (18-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-Above)
  • Sprint Distance – Teens
    • Teen  Male Age Group (15-17)
    • Teen Female Age Group (15-17)
    • Teen Male Age Group (13 – 14)
    • Teen Female Age Group (13 – 14)
  • Relay
    • Open category
RACE INCLUSIONS:
  • Swimming Cap/ Timing Chip/ Race Bib/ Bike & Helmet Sticker
  • Event Shirt/ Race Belt/ Finisher’s Medal
  • Unilab Active Health Token/ Post Race Meal

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2015 CANNONDALE CAAD10 GETS DISC BRAKE READY, SYNAPSE CARBON LINEUP GROWS AND MORE

26 Jun , 2014  

2015-Cannondale-CAAD10-Discbrake-road-bike02-600x392

2015 CANNONDALE CAAD10 GETS DISC BRAKE READY, SYNAPSE CARBON LINEUP GROWS AND MORE.

Cannondale’s 2015 road and cyclocross bike lineup commits to disc brakes, giving more road bike models the option and going all in for ‘cross. That’s right, all CAAD-X and SuperX cyclocross bikes are disc brake only, no more cantilever options. There’ll even be a SRAM CX1 build in the lineup!

The well regarded alloy CAAD10 models switched to internal routing for MY2014, and the new disc brake versions use it for both shift and brake runs. Cable ports are swappable for mechanical or electronic systems.

Check more details plus the slick new Synapse bikes and more below

2015-Cannondale-CAAD10-Discbrake-road-bike02-600x392

2015-Cannondale-CAAD10-Discbrake-road-bike02-600×392

2015-Cannondale-CAAD10-Discbrake-road-bike03-600x399

2015-Cannondale-CAAD10-Discbrake-road-bike03-600×399

Rear brake mount and dropout is forged from a single piece, which is stronger while saving weight and insuring perfect alignment. The rear triangle was redesigned to mimic the feel of the original. By changing the wall thickness throughout the tube’s radius, they got the same flex profile. It’s only about 5mm or less, but it’ll take the edge off bumps.

2015-Cannondale-CAAD10-Discbrake-road-bike09-600x399

2015-Cannondale-CAAD10-Discbrake-road-bike09-600×399

The dropouts get their Speed Tip angled inserts to guide the wheel in more quickly. The brake mounts use a combination of bonded in upper mount and carbon/alloy 3D forged piece on the bottom. So, they’re carbon dropouts with an alloy face and threads. Rotors shown here are not proper spec, it’ll get the new SRAM Centerline rotors.