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Ironman Performance – The Mini Taper Triathlon Philippines

13 Apr , 2017  

by Coach Alun Woodward, Ironguides Coach
 
Finally winter is coming to an end and the race season is rapidly approaching with a sprinkling of early season events already taking place. After months of hard training its exciting to finally get an opportunity to race and test your fitness.
When we are training hard we never really get to see our true fitness as its often hiding under a blanket of fatigue. It can be frustrating to train hard and not really see the progress taking place or feeling like every day is a struggle to get the work done, almost feeling unfit every day when in fact the complete opposite is true. When training for performance the reality is the only time we really see our true fitness and feel fit is race day! This level of fatigue in training is good and drives gains in fitness but when we want to test the fitness we do need to allow this fatigue to lift a little just to get a glimpse of the gains that have been made.
I see a lot of athletes take a full taper into their first events and often have amazing races then performance just trails off through the season as they repeatedly follow this taper process into every event as it worked so well the first time. The reason this happens is a full taper will bring the body to a peak of fitness and then from that point the only way is down, also the peak is related to the period of training banked before the taper, so tapering for every event from this point might mean only 2-3 weeks of training banked compared to maybe the 3-4 months before the first race.
Ideally we should be looking to taper just 1-2 times per year and for other races we simply train straight through using them as a training session or perform a mini taper or more a refresh of the system before the event.
While a full taper might be anywhere from 10 days to 2 weeks long before your big race a mini taper needs to be just 2-3 days long and will not allow full recovery but it will give your body a little rest and give you more fire power for race day without effecting your training progression.
So a mini taper will tend to start around Thursday to Friday of race week given Sunday is your race day. I do like to put one very easy day into this where you may get out for a easy 20min bike session just to keep the body moving but this day is about doing as little as possible. On the other days training should resemble your regular plan in terms of what systems your training but with reduced volume.
THURSDAY
3 full days out from the race is a great time to have a very easy day, looking to do as little as possible on the day or even take a full rest day. I always prefer to take this day to start the mini taper and then train for 2-3 days into the event.
A simple 20min run is enough on this day but its important that you eat as normal on this day – the lack or training and regular eating protocol will lead to some carbo loading effect for race day.
FRIDAY
Friday i like to have fairly similar to your regular training day in terms of structure but maybe take a little of the volume out of the overall program. Lets say on this day you normally have a morning swim and evening ride, we want to hit both sessions and make sure that the same stimulus from the session is hit but without the same fatigue, below are examples of how we can do this
Regular swim main set – 16x100m hard on 2minutes with last 8 repeats using paddles
Adapted Main set – 16x50m hard on 60s – last 8 repeat with paddles
So we are swimming the same speed so the body does not miss out on the speed stimulus but the interval is only half of normal so we are not going to be producing the same levels of fatigue.
The same idea can be applied to any session, below if an example of a bike session
Regular bike set – 8x40s all out sprints with 3minutes easy recovery between
Adapted bike set – 8min @ 20s all out / 40s rest
This main set is much shorter but the 20s all out efforts will see the legs still get the speed and power stimulus but not the same amount of damage that would occur in a 40s sprint – also the short recoveries between sprints stop the athlete being able to push too hard on the 20s sprints to lead to muscle damage.
SATURDAY
In a mini taper i like to use the day before the race for some easy aerobic volume, the volume here is very individual and depends on your regular training volume and also i find female athletes perform very well of more volume on the day before a race when compared with male athletes.
For example a female athlete who regularly trains 16 hours a week might do an easy 4 hour ride on this day, time in the saddle being the focus not distance as i like this ride to be very easy so speed is going to be low. If we look at a female athlete training 12 hours per week then this ride would be maximum 3 hour long so staying at 25% of the weekly volume.
For male athletes this bike session would be a lot shorter topping out at 90min for athletes typically training up to 16 hours a week and looking towards 2.5-3hours for athletes training over this amount per week.
SUNDAY – RACE DAY
Race day should be treated as any race day, so aim to be awake at least 3 hours before your race start time in order to fully wake your body up before the start. Starting your day with a easy 10min jog before breakfast is a great way to accelerate this process and make sure your ready to go when the race starts.
MONDAY – Back to work
Once race day is done then its time to get back to training, yes you will be carrying some fatigue from the race but in general race day is less volume and easier than a training day on your body so you should be fine to jump straight back to your regular program. A well structured program should see Monday as a recovery day from a weekend of longer endurance work so this is not different and you should be all systems go by the time harder work commences on the Tuesday.
A mini taper is a great way to allow you a glimpse of your true fitness without compromising your training and progression towards your big races of the year. This is also a great way to boost confidence as you head into another block of hard training which will no doubt once again lead to performance levels hiding under that blanket of fatigue.
Enjoy your training.
from http://www.asiatri.com

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Fight Cancer

3 Jan , 2017  

velo fight cancer

velo fight cancer

Tips and tricks,triathlon,Triathlon News,Triathlon Philippines

10 Common Bicycle Fitting Myths

7 Dec , 2016  

Over the years, I have heard my share of bicycle fitting myths. It’s hard not to be succumbed to them with the internet hosting blogs and videos on ‘how to fit your bike’ by any person out there. By understanding these misconceptions about bike fitting, you can learn how to avoid things that could be hampering your progress as a cyclist. You’ll also understand the process and science behind bicycle fitting and its value to you, regardless of your riding ability.
MYTH 1: I ONLY NEED A BIKE FIT IF MY POSITION IS VERY UNCOMFORTABLE OR IF I HAVE JUST PURCHASED A NEW BIKE

Bike fitting is an ongoing process. Your body is always changing from its fitness, flexibility, weight, and strength. It’s recommended to get a fit at least once a year. If you have just purchased a new bike, or have recovered from an injury or surgery, a bike fit is very important in optimizing your performance on the bike.
MYTH 2: IT DOESN’T WORK. I HAVE ALREADY RECEIVED A FIT BEFORE (FROM MANY DIFFERENT PEOPLE) AND IT DIDN’T HELP

It’s important to understand that the term ‘bike fit’ is used in many different contexts, as there are several different philosophies of fit and levels of fitting expertise. Some bike shops may advertise a ‘bike fit’, but are only offering a few minor adjustments, or the person performing the fit was never professionally trained. The FASTER Fit Lab represents the best fitting methodology in the world with our 2-Dimensional and 3-Dimensional camera systems and fitting expertise. By improving your biomechanics, we work to make you more efficient, more comfortable, and faster on your bike. The FASTER fit is a very in-depth service that takes 2 to 3 hours and involves: an interview on your medical history, flexibility testing, range of motion, and then spinning on the bike as we analyze your biomechanics and make adjustments to the bike and your position. After 30 days, we bring you back into the FASTER Fit Lab for a follow up fit (at no additional charge), to make any additional changes to your bike based upon how you have adjusted to the fit in your riding.
MYTH 3: I HAVE A BIG TRIATHLON EVENT COMING UP AND I DON’T WANT TO GET A FIT NOW BECAUSE THOSE CHANGES MIGHT BE DRAMATIC AND COULD AFFECT MY PERFORMANCE

When you have an event coming up, we work with you to ensure that the proper adjustments are made to make you more efficient on your bike without making major changes. The FASTER Fit includes a 30-day follow-up, which we would schedule with you for before your event, and use that time to make any major adjustments that may be necessary. That way, you will be more efficient for your event, and still get in the necessary fit adjustments to make an overall long term impact on your riding.
MYTH 4: I HAVE TRIED MANY DIFFERENT CUSTOM INSOLES FOR MY FEET, BUT KEEP GETTING NUMBNESS/TINGLING, HOT FEET, AND DISCOMFORT. MAYBE I HAVEN’T FOUND THE PERFECT INSOLES…

We’ve heard this many times from people and have always addressed this issue in the FASTER Fit lab. Issues with your feet usually result from improper cleat placement, saddle placement, and other adjustments on the bike. During the FASTER Fit, we spend a great deal of time working with your feet to make sure your feet are not only comfortable but to improve your overall efficiency on the bike.
MYTH 5: IF I LOWER MY STEM AND GET AS LOW AS POSSIBLE, IT WILL MAKE ME MORE AERO

Being hunched over in what people typically think of as an ‘aero’ position could be hindering your performance. There is a scientific formula for what angle your hips can be in before you lose power on the bike. Think about crimping a hose and the water not coming out. This is what you can do to your power on the bike by putting yourself in this position. During a recent experiment in the FASTER Wind Tunnel, Melissa experimented with lowering her stem on a Cervelo P3 time trial bike. After the test, we found her to not only be less aero, but she was extremely uncomfortable in this position.
MYTH 6: MY LOWER BACK IS BOTHERING ME, SO I PROBABLY NEED TO RAISE MY HANDLEBARS

We have often seen people make adjustments to their bike based on ‘symptoms’ and have not only aggravated those symptoms, but created new issues. Raising the handlebars does seem logical, but in some circumstances, can actually create more pressure in your lower back. If you are currently experiencing these symptoms, be sure to contact us directly and get proper advice.
MYTH 7: MY HANDS KEEP GOING NUMB. MAYBE IT’S EITHER MY GLOVES OR I’M GETTING OLD

Your hands are full of many nerves and unfortunately, cycling puts a lot of pressure on these nerves. Sometimes using padded gloves can help alleviate pressure on these nerves and reduce the numbness in your hands, but many times, this is caused by a fitting issue. A proper fit reduces the amount of pressure that is put on your arms. During a fit, we may adjust the distance and height your handlebars are from your body. We may also pick a new handlebar to improve your fit, as they come in many sizes and shapes (round or more flat).
MYTH 8: I NEED TO BUY A BIKE FIRST, AND THEN GET FIT TO THE BIKE

You can do it in this order, however at FASTER, we recommend getting a fit first, and taking your fit measurements to find your perfect new bike. Bikes have many different geometries between brands, and even models within a brand. Depending on your riding style, flexibility, goals, and fit measurements, we can help narrow down which options would work best for you and your budget.
MYTH 9: BIKE FITTING IS EXPENSIVE

We’ll admit, cycling isn’t a cheap sport. However, when you consider the costs of a new bike, wheels, or clothing, a bike fit is a minimal investment. At FASTER, we offer two levels of fitting: a 2D/3D fit for $299.99 and a Medical fit for $499.99. We also offer a 3D Speed Lab Fitting for $749.99 which involves a 2D/3D fit and an hour in our wind tunnel. This is for athletes who want to be completely optimized, where power output and respiration rate will be evaluated while aerodynamic drag is also measured. Investing in a fit can also prevent future costs of getting injured or not riding your bike because it was too uncomfortable.
MYTH 10: I ONLY GET DISCOMFORT WHEN I GO LONGER DISTANCES ON MY BIKE… SHOULD I JUST RIDE SHORTER DISTANCES FROM NOW ON?

Riding longer distances should be enjoyable yet challenging. A proper bike fit will ensure that no matter the distance you are riding, you are optimized in comfort and performance. You never have to resort to shorter distances on your bike rides, unless you absolutely want to.

 

article from thetrihub

Event News,Tips and tricks,Triathlon Philippines

What is Drafting in triathlon?

25 Oct , 2016  

please watch

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List all you need in Triathlon

4 Dec , 2014  

triathlon

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News: Schwalbe presents the final Procore-System for 2015

28 Aug , 2014  

Massive grip and high protection against punctures. – This is what Schwalbe promises. The Schwalbe Procore system proved itself able to handle the pressure on the race cicuit over the last couple of weeks. Nico Lau won the Enduro World Series races in Scotland and Sam Hill, the last Downhill Worldcup in Meribel, both riding procore.

There have been rumors about the new Schwalbe Procore system. But it is already clear that the system carries two air chambers. One evening after demo-day, Schwalbe revealed the new system, and it was immediately obvious they had made some new clever changes. Initially prototype versions had two valves, requiring modification to the rims, but Shwalbe presented the system with just one valve. Additionally, there have been some changes to their range of tyres too.

 

Massive grip and high protection against punctures. – This is what Schwalbe promises.  The Schwalbe Procore system proved itself able to handle the pressure on the race cicuit over the last couple of weeks. Nico Lau won the Enduro World Series races in Scotland and Sam Hill, the last Downhill Worldcup in Meribel, both riding procore.

Massive grip and high protection against punctures. – This is what Schwalbe promises.
The Schwalbe Procore system proved itself able to handle the pressure on the race cicuit over the last couple of weeks. Nico Lau won the Enduro World Series races in Scotland and Sam Hill, the last Downhill Worldcup in Meribel, both riding procore.

 

Massive grip and high protection against punctures. – This is what Schwalbe promises.

The Schwalbe Procore system proved itself able to handle the pressure on the race cicuit over the last couple of weeks. Nico Lau won the Enduro World Series races in Scotland and Sam Hill, the last Downhill Worldcup in Meribel, both riding procore.

 

Massive grip and high protection against punctures. – This is what Schwalbe promises.  The Schwalbe Procore system proved itself able to handle the pressure on the race cicuit over the last couple of weeks. Nico Lau won the Enduro World Series races in Scotland and Sam Hill, the last Downhill Worldcup in Meribel, both riding procore.

Massive grip and high protection against punctures. – This is what Schwalbe promises.
The Schwalbe Procore system proved itself able to handle the pressure on the race cicuit over the last couple of weeks. Nico Lau won the Enduro World Series races in Scotland and Sam Hill, the last Downhill Worldcup in Meribel, both riding procore.

Massive grip and high protection against punctures. – This is what Schwalbe promises.  The Schwalbe Procore system proved itself able to handle the pressure on the race cicuit over the last couple of weeks. Nico Lau won the Enduro World Series races in Scotland and Sam Hill, the last Downhill Worldcup in Meribel, both riding procore.

Massive grip and high protection against punctures. – This is what Schwalbe promises.
The Schwalbe Procore system proved itself able to handle the pressure on the race cicuit over the last couple of weeks. Nico Lau won the Enduro World Series races in Scotland and Sam Hill, the last Downhill Worldcup in Meribel, both riding procore.

Multisports,Race Result,Races,Tips and tricks,Training,triathlon

TRI UNITED 4 CLARK FONTANA

4 Aug , 2014  

EVENT DETAILS

DATE: November 23, 2014, Sunday
VENUE: Fontana Leisure Park, Clark, Pampanga
RACE DISTANCES:
  • Sprint  : 600m Swim/ 30Km Bike/ 5Km Run
  • Relay:  600m Swim/ 30Km Bike/ 5Km Run
  • Teens (15 to 17) :  600m Swim/ 15km Bike/ 5km Run
  • Teens (13 to 14) :  300m Swim/ 15km Bike/ 2.5km Run
DISTANCE Up to Aug 15 Up to Aug 31 Up to Sept 15 Up to Oct 15
Sprint & Teens P1,500 P2,000 P2,500 P3,000
Relay P3,000 P3,500 P4,000 P4,500
REMINDERS:
  • Deadline for registration is on October 15 or until slots last.
  • Deadline for registration subject to change depending on slot availability.
  • Registration fees are non-transferable by may be cancelled with refund. Check refund policy.
Refund Policy:
Athletes confirmed in the race who wish to withdraw, must do so in writing to the race office.
Email: registration@bikekingphilippines.com
It is the athlete’s responsibility to ensure the race office has received any communication. Upon confirmation of this request, athletes are eligible for a partial refund as follows:
  • Any requests received before October 15, 2014 will be eligible for a refund of 50%.
  • Any requests received after October 15, 2014 will be eligible for partial refund IF there is a registration wait list. Contact the race office should there be a wait list.
If you do not receive a response from the race office within 5 days from request, it should be assumed that it has not been received and you should contact us by phone.

Online registration link: www.bikekingphilippines.com

SCHEDULE OF ACTIVITIES:
DATE TIME ACTIVITY GENDER AGE GROUP WAVE
Sunday
November 23, 2014
5:00 AM Transition Area Opens
START OF RACE 
6:00 AM Teens Female 13-14/15-17 1
6:10 AM Teens Male 13-14/15-17 2
6:20 AM Sprint Female 18-24 3
6:20 AM Sprint Male 18-24 3
6:30 AM Sprint Female 25-29 4
6:40 AM Sprint Male 25-29 5
6:50 AM Sprint Female 30-34 6
7:00 AM Sprint Male 30-34  7
7:10 AM Sprint Male 30-34  8
7:20 AM Sprint Female 35-39 9
7:30 AM Sprint Male 50-55 10
7:30 AM Sprint Male 55-Above 10
7:40 AM Team Competition Mix 11
7:50 AM Sprint Female 40-44 12
8:00 AM Sprint Male 40-44  13
8:10 AM Sprint Female 45-Above 14
8:20 AM Sprint Male 45-49 15
8:30 AM Relay Mix 16
8:40 AM Sprint Male 35-39  17
8:50 AM Sprint Male 35-39  18
Starting time may change depending on the number of entries
11:30 AM AWARDING
AWARD/ PRIZES:
All Top 3 Male and Female category winners will receive MEDALS and GIFTPACKS:
CATEGORY:
  • Sprint Distance – Adult
    • Male Age Group (18-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-Above)
    • Female Age Group (18-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-Above)
  • Sprint Distance – Teens
    • Teen  Male Age Group (15-17)
    • Teen Female Age Group (15-17)
    • Teen Male Age Group (13 – 14)
    • Teen Female Age Group (13 – 14)
  • Relay
    • Open category
RACE INCLUSIONS:
  • Swimming Cap/ Timing Chip/ Race Bib/ Bike & Helmet Sticker
  • Event Shirt/ Race Belt/ Finisher’s Medal
  • Unilab Active Health Token/ Post Race Meal

News,Review:,Tips and tricks,Triathlon Philippines

2015 CANNONDALE CAAD10 GETS DISC BRAKE READY, SYNAPSE CARBON LINEUP GROWS AND MORE

26 Jun , 2014  

2015-Cannondale-CAAD10-Discbrake-road-bike02-600x392

2015 CANNONDALE CAAD10 GETS DISC BRAKE READY, SYNAPSE CARBON LINEUP GROWS AND MORE.

Cannondale’s 2015 road and cyclocross bike lineup commits to disc brakes, giving more road bike models the option and going all in for ‘cross. That’s right, all CAAD-X and SuperX cyclocross bikes are disc brake only, no more cantilever options. There’ll even be a SRAM CX1 build in the lineup!

The well regarded alloy CAAD10 models switched to internal routing for MY2014, and the new disc brake versions use it for both shift and brake runs. Cable ports are swappable for mechanical or electronic systems.

Check more details plus the slick new Synapse bikes and more below

2015-Cannondale-CAAD10-Discbrake-road-bike02-600x392

2015-Cannondale-CAAD10-Discbrake-road-bike02-600×392

2015-Cannondale-CAAD10-Discbrake-road-bike03-600x399

2015-Cannondale-CAAD10-Discbrake-road-bike03-600×399

Rear brake mount and dropout is forged from a single piece, which is stronger while saving weight and insuring perfect alignment. The rear triangle was redesigned to mimic the feel of the original. By changing the wall thickness throughout the tube’s radius, they got the same flex profile. It’s only about 5mm or less, but it’ll take the edge off bumps.

2015-Cannondale-CAAD10-Discbrake-road-bike09-600x399

2015-Cannondale-CAAD10-Discbrake-road-bike09-600×399

The dropouts get their Speed Tip angled inserts to guide the wheel in more quickly. The brake mounts use a combination of bonded in upper mount and carbon/alloy 3D forged piece on the bottom. So, they’re carbon dropouts with an alloy face and threads. Rotors shown here are not proper spec, it’ll get the new SRAM Centerline rotors.

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RECOVERY AFTER YOUR HARD TRAINING

21 Mar , 2014  

triathlonphilippines

If you’re training hard for an endurance race, getting your recovery right is vital for staving off muscle soreness and improving your performance. We asked sports nutritionist, James Collins some of your most commonly asked questions…

 

Recovery after run

Recovery after run

How to recover after your run

Question 1:

After exercise

When should I be eating after a run to maximise recovery?
James says:
The sooner the better – ideally within 30 minutes after running as your body needs essential nutrients to kick start the growth and repair process after a hard training session.

Question 2:

Is protein or carbohydrate more important for recovery?
James says:
Both are critical for full recovery after training. Carbohydrates are the body’s main fuel source, and are stored as glycogen in the muscles and liver. As the body can only store a certain amount of carbohydrate, once depleted through exercise these reserves need to be replaced before your next training session.
Protein is vital for the growth and repair of muscle tissue and as hard training depletes the body’s stores it is important to refuel with high-protein snacks as soon as possible. Ensuring you replenish stores after each training session can significantly reduce muscle soreness the following day. If you can’t face eating straight after a run, introduce fluids to your recovery strategy.
Melon & crunchy bran pots
20g of protein is the magic number that you need to hit to optimise the recovery process after training. The following snacks will help you reach this target:

  • 500ml milkshake
  • Natural yogurt based fruit smoothie
  • Sandwich with lean meats, eggs, or low-fat cheese
  • Greek yogurt, granola and mixed berries

Some good recovery recipes with well balanced protein and carbohydrates include:

  • Open mackerel sandwich with fennel slaw
  • Melon & crunchy bran pots
  • Open chicken Caesar sandwich
  • Instant frozen berry yogurt
  • Open cottage cheese & pepper sandwich
  • Salmon & chive bagel topper

Question 3:

If you’re watching your weight, how do you balance eating for recovery with continued weight loss? How much should you eat?
Barley, chicken & mushroom risotto
James says:
It is possible to balance proper recovery after exercise with weight loss – it’s just about getting the balance right. Although many of the questions mention carbohydrates, it is important to adjust your daily intake depending on your training. Intake should be higher on ‘key’ training days and reduced on days with less training.
When managing your weight, try to get most of your carbohydrates from low-GI foods at mealtimes, rather than lots of higher GI snacks. These will also keep your feeling fuller for longer.
Where possible, eat meals as part of your recovery plan following your run, instead of adding in extra recovery snacks, which increase your total energy (calorie) intake for the day. This may take more planning to coincide runs with mealtimes.

Question 4:

How long after running a marathon would it be sensible to start training again?After running recoveryJames says:
It is important to listen to your body on this one. Physiologically, your body can be ready to start training after a few days, especially as fitness levels are often greatly improved with endurance training. However, don’t underestimate the fatigue you may experience over the following week. It is usually advisable for runners to have a break of a week to get a well earned physical, and psychological break from training, before lacing up the trainers again.

Question 5:

What are the key components for a post-marathon recovery plan?
James says:Rehydrate
When you think recovery, think of ‘The Four R’s’:
Rest – Get a good night’s sleep – this is when most of your muscle repair will occur.
Rehydrate – Replace fluid losses by drinking at regular intervals throughout the day.
Repair – Eat 20g of protein soon after exercise to kick start muscle repair.
Refuel – Eat carbohydrates to help restore energy – a minimum of 1g per kilogram bodyweight is a good general guide.

source: bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/how-recover-after-your-run

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TO HAVE WORLD-CLASS ATHLETES, TAKE POLITICS OUT OF PH SPORTS

18 Mar , 2014  

Uytengsu Jr.

LOS ANGELES, California – Before Wilfred Uytengsu, Jr., president and CEO of Alaska Milk, became a competitive tri-athlete, he was a swimmer. In fact, he was the captain of the University of Southern California swim team.

Uytengsu recently returned to his alma mater to inaugurate the renovated swimming facility named after him, the Uytengsu Aquatics Center, thanks to his $8 million donation, the biggest gift to USC by a student-athlete and a Filipino. http://www.usctrojans.com/sports/m-swim/recaps/022114aaa.html Uytengsu sat for an interview with INQUIRER.net to talk about his passion for swimming, lessons he learned from his late father, and his thoughts on the state of Philippine sports. How was your experience being one of the few minorities on the USC swim team? There was a Japanese American swimmer whose name is Scott Matsuda and there was Ben Lau who is Chinese American. There were three of us there during my time I never really looked at whether I was Asian or Asian American, that just didn’t really enter into the equation. It was whether you were willing to put in the work as an athlete. What must be done to have more world-class athletes from the Philippines?

This going to be a little bit controversial, but I think we need to take the politics out of the Philippine Olympic Committee (POC), the Sports Commission and I the Philippine Amateur Swimming Association, of which I was briefly the president shortly after I returned to the Philippines.
The parents approached me and said there are all kinds of problems in the swimming program — a lot of favoritism going on. I was a victim (of favoritism) too. When I came back to swim in the 1981 Southeast Asian Games, the coach took me out of my major events because his swimmer was swimming the same events. I said, “Well, let’s race right now. The fastest swimmer swims.” And he said, “No, it’s too late to do that.” I said it’s going to take less than a minute.
In a sport like swimming or track and field, anything that’s with a stopwatch, it’s pretty simple who should be on your national team, the fastest athletes. Now you could argue in figure skating or gymnastics, it’s a subjective sport. It’s a little bit hard to do. But when it’s time-based, it should be your fastest athletes.
Granted, we had the good fortune of having the likes of the Concepcion Brothers, Eric Buhain, Akiko Thomson, and a few others, all of whom were training in the United States. You have to ask yourself again, “Why are our best swimmers training abroad?” Again, I think it’s the politics. And so, the heads of all the national sports associations, whether it’s swimming, football, or basketball, I think they need to put the athletes’ concerns first, make sure they have the right coaching, the right nutrition.
Unfortunately, I don’t see that happening and that’s why we see the Philippines less competitive today than we were 40 years ago. Now, I think there are a few people in sports who are trying to make a difference, but I don’t think they’re in the majority.
Describe the work that you are doing with the Alaska Youth Development Program.
We have a professional basketball team that has achieved some success given us some pedigree to run basketball camps. We have the franchise to sponsor both Junior NBA, and this year we launched Junior WNBA. We’re partnering with arguably the best name in basketball globally, the National Basketball Association, and with its coaches. We take the top 10 players of the boys to play a tournament. Last year, they got to go to Staples Center, and Kobe Bryant came out on to the court. We’re also going to pick five girls to do that and one coach because we realized it’s important that the coaches have the fundamentals.
The second initiative is in football. Long before the Azkals became popular, we’ve long supported soccer in the Philippines, and we’ve run soccer camps through the summer. We run the single largest tournament in the country called the Alaska Cup. We’ve been doing that for 16 years, and 3,500 kids in a weekend, as young as five years old, from the clubs at school and organizations participate.
We have added to that a small batch of aspirational tri-athletes; we have six children who we think have the potential to become tri-athletes. We sponsor them in what we call Alaska Tri-aspire and we’d like to see them (this is separate from the Triathlon Association of the Philippines) become the best tri-athletes they can be and perhaps represent the Philippine one day at the Asian games, and who knows, maybe one day, the Olympics.
How did your father, Wilfred Uytengsu, Sr., influence your philanthropic work?
My father had become more philanthropically inclined in the last 10 years of his life. He decided that he wanted to give back to one of his universities. He was at Stanford and he got his second engineering degree at Indiana Tech. He transformed the latter’s alumni house, an old antebellum building into a LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certified green building. My father being an engineer was really intrigued about the environmental engineering challenges for that, so he said, “Sure. Let’s go ahead and do it.” http://www.indianatech.edu/News/Pages/Dedication.aspx
I remember the stories that I would hear about him, talking about it almost like a teenager in the enthusiasm of my father. The sad part is, my father passed away two months before the building was completed. So I went to Indiana Tech and I kind of had to give the speech that he would have given for that.
It was really unfortunate that he didn’t get the chance to see what he wanted to share. I talked to my wife whom I met at USC and I said, “We should not wait ‘til we’re not around to give back because I think the joy, the pleasure of seeing people receive what it is we give and whatever that maybe, I think it’s coming back ten-fold to us. Why wait ‘til you’re six feet under when you can afford to do so?”
Why did you decide to donate $8 million dollars to the USC Aquatics department?
The USC swim program is one of the best in the nation. I wasn’t recruited to swim at a major program. I had a chance to swim at smaller ones. But when I was invited by a family friend to look at USC and I saw the Olympians, I said to myself, “I would much rather be a smaller fish in a big pond and have the opportunity to compete and participate at the highest level possible.”
I was in a car accident in my senior year. I broke my leg and they said that I probably wasn’t going to swim again. And so, I showed up on campus in a cast and had to start my first six to eight weeks swimming with a cast, which was kind of crazy.
The challenges and opportunities I had at USC had a big impact on my life, personally and professionally. I knew at some point in time that I would like to be able to give back to the university.

source Read more: http://sports.inquirer.net/147956/to-have-world-class-athletes-take-politics-out-of-ph-sports-uytengsu-jr#ixzz2wIP9PyAK
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