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Ironman training: Tips for getting faster and stronger

11 Dec , 2017  

The key swim sessions, cardio workouts and core strength exercises in the Barclay armoury

1. Utilise speed surges

Our key swim strength set is a weekly 3.8km with speed surges. This 60-90min session replicates what happens during an Ironman. It works best with two people of a similar swimming ability.
Warm-up 400m building intensity.
Main set 500m Swimmer 1 (S1) leads with Swimmer 2 (S2) drafting on their toes then S2 surges to take the lead for 500m. Repeat this pattern for 400m, twice for 300m, once for 200m, and twice for 100m.
Cool-down 3 x 100m easy.

2. Mix cardio with intensity

 

jualyn triathlon philippines

Aim for a mix of intensity and steady swimming in your swim sets. We aim to swim 4-5 times per week. Depending on the phase of training, between three and four of these sessions will involve quite a bit of intensity. Then the other one or two sessions will be strictly cardio with some technique and drills. A swim background will provide you with the cardiovascular fitness to succeed in triathlon. But, more than anything, swimming will give you mental strength.

3. Core strength is key

Core strength and shoulder stability are essential to swimming, so this should be a big part of your strength training. Other exercises such as weighted chin-ups, lat pull-downs and bent-over rows are important for building the power of each arm pull through the water. We usually perform chin-ups to failure and repeat x3. This is around 10-15 reps depending on the additional weight added. To get the benefit of lat pull-downs and bent-over rows, we complete 3 rounds of 10-15 reps.

Make bike strength your goal
A big bike strength set will build endurance for Ironman racing. But don’t forget to refuel and build your core, says Lucy

4. Build base endurance

Perform a long bike set with a mix of intensities to build base endurance for Ironman and 70.3 racing, and sharpen up your body in the build-up. My key bike strength set is 2:30hrs. I perform it weekly, but not on race week, and use a turbo.

Warm-up 15mins building intensity.
Main set 5 x [20mins at between Ironman and 70.3 power/intensity (depending on the phase of training you’re in), followed by 5mins recovery easy spinning].
Cool-down 10mins easy spinning.

5. Refuelling focus

Ensure you keep your body fuelled during a long ride. I use gels and bars and, once home, I’ll have a protein shake with frozen berries, milk and peanut butter while preparing my favourite post-training meal of gluten-free toast, two poached eggs, half an avocado and grated cheese. I spend a good 15-20mins foam rolling after a long bike session and then rest and recover in my recovery gear from Compressport.

6. Make S&C bike specific

As well as the basic core exercises such as the plank and sit-ups, free weight leg exercises will build strength for the bike. These challenge the core muscles while working the legs, so it’s more specific to cycling. These exercises include: squats, lunges, deadlifts and single-leg squats using the TRX suspension resistance bands. Also look to do pre-emptive ‘Prehab’ work to prevent you from getting injuries, improve posture and to sort out any muscle

Strength training for cycling: 6 key exercises

Follow your S&C with informed recovery
Don’t forget the strength and conditioning when training for tri, says Lucy imbalances.

7. Aim for sustained strength

Our 2-3 S&C weekly sessions are key for sustained Ironman strength.

Warm-up 5mins of rowing, 3 x 10 kettle bell goblet squats.
Set 1 3 x 15 squats with barbell weight, 45secs rest.
Set 2 3 x 10 (each leg) lunges with barbell weight, 45secs rest.
Set 3 3 x 15 leg press (75kg), 3 x 15 calf raises (75kg), 45secs rest.
Set 4 3 x 15 leg extensions (30kg), 3 x 15 hamstring curl (20kg), 45secs rest.
Set 5 3 x [10 ab wheel roll out, 60secs plank, 45secs flutter kicks].
Cool-down 5mins easy spinning.

8. Supplement your diet

I use a wide range of supplements to complement my diet. These include calcium, iron, glucosamine and CurraNZ (a blackcurrant extract from New Zealand) that promotes blood circulation, oxygen delivery and fat burning. All my supplements are from the batch-tested range at Informed-Sport. Post-session, I use Vanilla Whey protein powder from MyProtein.com. I normally have two protein shakes per day after sessions, both with a 25g scoop of protein powder.

9. Don’t forget to R&R

Rest and recovery is just as important as performing the hard training and gym-based sessions; it’s the glue that holds everything together. I foam roll and stretch at least once a day, especially after a hard bike or run session. I also use compression gear to keep the blood flowing around the body after training. In addition to this, we’re lucky to have a set of Normatec boots, the pulsing compression device that seems to work wonders on our tired legs.

Hills, trails and drills are key for an iron core
Variety in your strength training will pay dividends on the run come Ironman race day, says Reece. Here’s why…

10. Hit the hills

Hill reps are key for building strength and endurance. We perform this 60min run set weekly but it’s reduced in volume on race week and used as a sharpening set.

Warm-up 2-3km of steady running.
Main set 1 5 x 2mins uphill road reps working hard. Recovery is the easy jog back down the hill to your start point. Then do a steady jog of 2-3km steady running to break up the session.
Main set 2 5 x 2mins uphill road reps working hard. Recovery is the easy jog back down the hill to your start point.
Cool-down 1-2 km easy jogging back home.

11. Combine reps and off-road

We’re lucky to have some great trails near us in Epping Forest. We combine our weekly hill reps with off-road running to build strength and make us more resilient.

12. Seek a strong core

Having a strong core will help you maintain good run posture, especially when you’re fatigued on the Ironman marathon run leg. Aim to perform drills such as high knees, lunge rotations and bounding before your run sessions.

13. Don’t suffer alone

It’s easier to hurt your way through a tough set when you know you’re not suffering alone. We’ve had to learn to not always push each other and back off the intensity when the sessions are meant to be easy. Which is easier said then done given our competitive natures!

14 Key Iron fuelling

The essential food and drink supplies in the Reece Barclay and Lucy Charles shopping basket.

Tomato soup: each bowl of tomato soup contains vitamins E, A, C, K, essential minerals and antioxidants. It tastes great, too.
Nuts & berries: snacking on nuts and berries in between meals helps us from turning to the treat cupboard, which isn’t always easy!
Avocado: these provide us with healthy monounsaturated fatty acids and a good dose of natural vitamins and mineral
Protein powder: quick and easy whey protein powder after workouts kickstarts our recovery so that we’re prepared for our next session(s)
Chicken: chicken salads for lunch or chicken curry for dinner. Both are quick and easy to prepare and offer a protein boost.
Coffee: we drink coffee because of its stimulant properties and taste. After 12pm we switch to decaffeinated.
Eggs: poached eggs with avocado is a great breakfast. They’re a source of protein and vitamins, and keep you feeling full.
Carbs: we recently switched to gluten-free foods, such as bread and pasta, and instantly felt less bloated and lethargic.

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Finding the right coaches for triathlon

30 Nov , 2017  

Interview checklist

According to Lovato, whether your coach lives next door or in another country, it’s important to consider the following when evaluating a list of potential coaches:

Accessibility

Ask potential coaches exactly how available they’ll be to you. Some will state on their websites how many emails, phone calls, Skype calls or in-person meetings each athlete will receive: Make sure it’s a reasonable amount of contact for your needs. Riell and Lovato both like to hear from their athletes weekly but recognize this will ebb and flow based on the individual. At the very least, your coach should be receiving regular feedback from you, and creating training plans based on that interaction.

 

For me first ask them for certification:

  • Basic First Aid – I think this is very important for every coach because of intense training, weather condition and life threatening emergency
  • Basic water rescue – manage to have a license for water rescue in case you have panic on the water
  • Certification triathlon coaching – To check if the technique of teaching is a standard procedure and not by instinct


coaches for triathlon Personality

No matter how smart, experienced or high-profile a coach is, he or she will be ineffective at guiding you if your personalities aren’t compatible. Before you initiate the interview process, write down your goals. Then ask yourself what you need to have the best shot at achieving those goals. Is it a coach who takes a firm hand while pushing you? Or perhaps a bit more nurturing is in order? You might come to the conclusion that it’s a bit of both. Doing this self-analysis will help you to narrow to your final candidates.

Flexibility

To be truly effective, a coach must be flexible in his or her administration of workouts. It’s essential to be bold and ask questions about his/her philosophy on adapting a program to fit your needs. What happens if a workout is missed? Will he or she consider modifications based on what feels better to you as your training continues? Sure, all coaches think they have the best approach to training an athlete, but without the willingness to adapt that method to fit the individual, there will be eventual roadblocks in the progression.

Skill set
Triathlon Coach
Research your coaching candidates enough to know if he or she is qualified or experienced enough to teach, guide and lead you. If you’re interviewing candidates from a personal referral, still be sure to ask to speak to current and/or previous clients. While it’s not necessary for your coach to be an IRONMAN, some competition-specific experience might go a long way in the empathy department. At the very least, he or she should be a certified personal trainer or hold a Level 1 USAT Coaches Certification.

Scheduling

You’ll need to reconcile your day-to-day life with training. Lovato and Riell stress the need for a good coach to consider your family schedule, working hours and social activities when writing a training plan. He or she should be available and willing to adjust workouts based on what’s happening in your life. Again, being sure to ask any questions not addressed in your initial consultation will go a long way in avoiding feeling frustrated if the athlete/coach relationship doesn’t meet your expectations.

Personal traits

It goes without saying that a positive working relationship is essential. But how much of a buddy should your coach be? Remember that you aren’t hiring an enabler, but a trainer. Here, a few questions to ask a potential coach—and yourself—to make sure you get the most out of the relationship.

Will I trust him/her?

A successful athlete/coach relationship will help you reach your potential if, and only if, you trust his or her judgment and knowledge base. Research fully ahead of time, but once you’ve selected a coach, the trust factor must be maintained so you may confidently follow their guidance.

Am I open to feedback?

Will you be able to accept both positive and negative feedback from this coach? Just as significant, will you feel confident communicating feedback on how you feel your training is progressing?

Will he/she help me mentally?

Successful coaches shape bodies and minds. Helping athletes develop the attitude for optimal training and racing is just as important as assisting them in performing to their physical potential. Does this prospective coach fit that model?

Can I feel the passion?

Does he or she seem truly passionate about coaching? Can you count on help as needed to boost your motivation?
Above all, be true to yourself and your athletic and personal integrity. First impressions count for a lot, but due diligence and thoughtful consideration of your specific needs will land you a long-term coaching match.

Originally from: ironman

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Triathlon Training Tips

23 Jul , 2017  

riptide singapore
1. Train alone

When I first started my career in triathlon, I got to a certain level by training with my buddies, in groups and non-structured environments. I then left for a while and came back with a whole new attitude. I found a coach I liked and really appreciated his ideas. So I committed myself to the training. I rarely trained with people. Eighty-five to 90 percent of the training I did alone, which worked for me. So if I were climbing a hill and my heart rate spiked, I’d walk up the hill. This created self-confidence. I came out and won my first race by training alone, which was Wildflower, a tough course.

riptide

2. Do drills

People neglect cycling and running drills. I did them. So on race day I would lose as little fitness as possible. I could be more efficient, not really falling apart halfway through the marathon because of the training drills. The reality is you should be doing drills all the time, year in and year out. I was different than a lot of pros by doing that.

riptide
3. Train for a race

Don’t train for general fitness. I think I was one of the first to train on the Big Island. I trained in the heat and learned the currents of the water. When I did Wildflower, I’d incorporate rides and runs similar to that course. I found out the course had lots of trails and hills, so I thought, okay, I need to run hills and train specific to that course.

4. Put yourself in pain

This one is kind of sadistic. I always had this problem of my stomach shutting down during the marathon of an Ironman. So I thought if I could run with my stomach shutting down, I could do it in a race. So once a week I would sit down and eat nachos with really spicy hot sauce. Then I’d get my running gear on, go for a run and of course, my stomach would shut down, but I’d just keep going. They were brutal training runs. But then on race day, when my stomach would shut down I’d think, “I can deal with this.” I’d be able to keep going. Doing this paid off so many times over. I’d do this 10 weeks out from Ironman until two weeks before race day. It’d be a horrible run, but it had a huge impact on my overall race performance.

5. Spend the dough

I see this with a lot of age-groupers. They spend so much time and effort training for an Ironman and they don’t bother to get new tires or get a tune-up. Get new tires. Get a new chain if you need it. You’ve invested so much time, just pay the couple of extra bucks. Don’t cheap out. It’s worth the extra expense.

6. Get out of shape

I got this piece of advice from Paula Newby-Fraser and it was one of the best things I have heard. She told me, “Peter, you can have a great short career or you can have a great long career. But you need to take time to leave the sport behind you.” Basically, you need to get out of shape to get back into shape. You need to physically and mentally recharge. You need to become a non-athlete. Don’t eat healthy. It hurts your fitness, sure, but it makes for a better long-term career. Mark Allen did this and it worked for him. Doing this prepares your body for another season. It was so easy for me to do this because two legends told me they did it. It felt like a part of the puzzle of being pro.

7. Don’t workout when sick

I see so many athletes tinker with their workouts when they are sick. Don’t. Take the day off.

BMC singapore

8. Know your body

If you head out the door and your knee hurts, don’t push through it because then all of a sudden you’re injured and you are out. Stop exercising and take a couple of days off rather than be out a couple of weeks.

tips from www.triathlete.com

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How To Fix A Bike Puncture – Repairing An Inner Tube

4 Jul , 2017  

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Ironman Performance – The Mini Taper Triathlon Philippines

13 Apr , 2017  

by Coach Alun Woodward, Ironguides Coach
 
Finally winter is coming to an end and the race season is rapidly approaching with a sprinkling of early season events already taking place. After months of hard training its exciting to finally get an opportunity to race and test your fitness.
When we are training hard we never really get to see our true fitness as its often hiding under a blanket of fatigue. It can be frustrating to train hard and not really see the progress taking place or feeling like every day is a struggle to get the work done, almost feeling unfit every day when in fact the complete opposite is true. When training for performance the reality is the only time we really see our true fitness and feel fit is race day! This level of fatigue in training is good and drives gains in fitness but when we want to test the fitness we do need to allow this fatigue to lift a little just to get a glimpse of the gains that have been made.
I see a lot of athletes take a full taper into their first events and often have amazing races then performance just trails off through the season as they repeatedly follow this taper process into every event as it worked so well the first time. The reason this happens is a full taper will bring the body to a peak of fitness and then from that point the only way is down, also the peak is related to the period of training banked before the taper, so tapering for every event from this point might mean only 2-3 weeks of training banked compared to maybe the 3-4 months before the first race.
Ideally we should be looking to taper just 1-2 times per year and for other races we simply train straight through using them as a training session or perform a mini taper or more a refresh of the system before the event.
While a full taper might be anywhere from 10 days to 2 weeks long before your big race a mini taper needs to be just 2-3 days long and will not allow full recovery but it will give your body a little rest and give you more fire power for race day without effecting your training progression.
So a mini taper will tend to start around Thursday to Friday of race week given Sunday is your race day. I do like to put one very easy day into this where you may get out for a easy 20min bike session just to keep the body moving but this day is about doing as little as possible. On the other days training should resemble your regular plan in terms of what systems your training but with reduced volume.
THURSDAY
3 full days out from the race is a great time to have a very easy day, looking to do as little as possible on the day or even take a full rest day. I always prefer to take this day to start the mini taper and then train for 2-3 days into the event.
A simple 20min run is enough on this day but its important that you eat as normal on this day – the lack or training and regular eating protocol will lead to some carbo loading effect for race day.
FRIDAY
Friday i like to have fairly similar to your regular training day in terms of structure but maybe take a little of the volume out of the overall program. Lets say on this day you normally have a morning swim and evening ride, we want to hit both sessions and make sure that the same stimulus from the session is hit but without the same fatigue, below are examples of how we can do this
Regular swim main set – 16x100m hard on 2minutes with last 8 repeats using paddles
Adapted Main set – 16x50m hard on 60s – last 8 repeat with paddles
So we are swimming the same speed so the body does not miss out on the speed stimulus but the interval is only half of normal so we are not going to be producing the same levels of fatigue.
The same idea can be applied to any session, below if an example of a bike session
Regular bike set – 8x40s all out sprints with 3minutes easy recovery between
Adapted bike set – 8min @ 20s all out / 40s rest
This main set is much shorter but the 20s all out efforts will see the legs still get the speed and power stimulus but not the same amount of damage that would occur in a 40s sprint – also the short recoveries between sprints stop the athlete being able to push too hard on the 20s sprints to lead to muscle damage.
SATURDAY
In a mini taper i like to use the day before the race for some easy aerobic volume, the volume here is very individual and depends on your regular training volume and also i find female athletes perform very well of more volume on the day before a race when compared with male athletes.
For example a female athlete who regularly trains 16 hours a week might do an easy 4 hour ride on this day, time in the saddle being the focus not distance as i like this ride to be very easy so speed is going to be low. If we look at a female athlete training 12 hours per week then this ride would be maximum 3 hour long so staying at 25% of the weekly volume.
For male athletes this bike session would be a lot shorter topping out at 90min for athletes typically training up to 16 hours a week and looking towards 2.5-3hours for athletes training over this amount per week.
SUNDAY – RACE DAY
Race day should be treated as any race day, so aim to be awake at least 3 hours before your race start time in order to fully wake your body up before the start. Starting your day with a easy 10min jog before breakfast is a great way to accelerate this process and make sure your ready to go when the race starts.
MONDAY – Back to work
Once race day is done then its time to get back to training, yes you will be carrying some fatigue from the race but in general race day is less volume and easier than a training day on your body so you should be fine to jump straight back to your regular program. A well structured program should see Monday as a recovery day from a weekend of longer endurance work so this is not different and you should be all systems go by the time harder work commences on the Tuesday.
A mini taper is a great way to allow you a glimpse of your true fitness without compromising your training and progression towards your big races of the year. This is also a great way to boost confidence as you head into another block of hard training which will no doubt once again lead to performance levels hiding under that blanket of fatigue.
Enjoy your training.
from http://www.asiatri.com

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Fight Cancer

3 Jan , 2017  

velo fight cancer

velo fight cancer

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10 Common Bicycle Fitting Myths

7 Dec , 2016  

Over the years, I have heard my share of bicycle fitting myths. It’s hard not to be succumbed to them with the internet hosting blogs and videos on ‘how to fit your bike’ by any person out there. By understanding these misconceptions about bike fitting, you can learn how to avoid things that could be hampering your progress as a cyclist. You’ll also understand the process and science behind bicycle fitting and its value to you, regardless of your riding ability.
MYTH 1: I ONLY NEED A BIKE FIT IF MY POSITION IS VERY UNCOMFORTABLE OR IF I HAVE JUST PURCHASED A NEW BIKE

Bike fitting is an ongoing process. Your body is always changing from its fitness, flexibility, weight, and strength. It’s recommended to get a fit at least once a year. If you have just purchased a new bike, or have recovered from an injury or surgery, a bike fit is very important in optimizing your performance on the bike.
MYTH 2: IT DOESN’T WORK. I HAVE ALREADY RECEIVED A FIT BEFORE (FROM MANY DIFFERENT PEOPLE) AND IT DIDN’T HELP

It’s important to understand that the term ‘bike fit’ is used in many different contexts, as there are several different philosophies of fit and levels of fitting expertise. Some bike shops may advertise a ‘bike fit’, but are only offering a few minor adjustments, or the person performing the fit was never professionally trained. The FASTER Fit Lab represents the best fitting methodology in the world with our 2-Dimensional and 3-Dimensional camera systems and fitting expertise. By improving your biomechanics, we work to make you more efficient, more comfortable, and faster on your bike. The FASTER fit is a very in-depth service that takes 2 to 3 hours and involves: an interview on your medical history, flexibility testing, range of motion, and then spinning on the bike as we analyze your biomechanics and make adjustments to the bike and your position. After 30 days, we bring you back into the FASTER Fit Lab for a follow up fit (at no additional charge), to make any additional changes to your bike based upon how you have adjusted to the fit in your riding.
MYTH 3: I HAVE A BIG TRIATHLON EVENT COMING UP AND I DON’T WANT TO GET A FIT NOW BECAUSE THOSE CHANGES MIGHT BE DRAMATIC AND COULD AFFECT MY PERFORMANCE

When you have an event coming up, we work with you to ensure that the proper adjustments are made to make you more efficient on your bike without making major changes. The FASTER Fit includes a 30-day follow-up, which we would schedule with you for before your event, and use that time to make any major adjustments that may be necessary. That way, you will be more efficient for your event, and still get in the necessary fit adjustments to make an overall long term impact on your riding.
MYTH 4: I HAVE TRIED MANY DIFFERENT CUSTOM INSOLES FOR MY FEET, BUT KEEP GETTING NUMBNESS/TINGLING, HOT FEET, AND DISCOMFORT. MAYBE I HAVEN’T FOUND THE PERFECT INSOLES…

We’ve heard this many times from people and have always addressed this issue in the FASTER Fit lab. Issues with your feet usually result from improper cleat placement, saddle placement, and other adjustments on the bike. During the FASTER Fit, we spend a great deal of time working with your feet to make sure your feet are not only comfortable but to improve your overall efficiency on the bike.
MYTH 5: IF I LOWER MY STEM AND GET AS LOW AS POSSIBLE, IT WILL MAKE ME MORE AERO

Being hunched over in what people typically think of as an ‘aero’ position could be hindering your performance. There is a scientific formula for what angle your hips can be in before you lose power on the bike. Think about crimping a hose and the water not coming out. This is what you can do to your power on the bike by putting yourself in this position. During a recent experiment in the FASTER Wind Tunnel, Melissa experimented with lowering her stem on a Cervelo P3 time trial bike. After the test, we found her to not only be less aero, but she was extremely uncomfortable in this position.
MYTH 6: MY LOWER BACK IS BOTHERING ME, SO I PROBABLY NEED TO RAISE MY HANDLEBARS

We have often seen people make adjustments to their bike based on ‘symptoms’ and have not only aggravated those symptoms, but created new issues. Raising the handlebars does seem logical, but in some circumstances, can actually create more pressure in your lower back. If you are currently experiencing these symptoms, be sure to contact us directly and get proper advice.
MYTH 7: MY HANDS KEEP GOING NUMB. MAYBE IT’S EITHER MY GLOVES OR I’M GETTING OLD

Your hands are full of many nerves and unfortunately, cycling puts a lot of pressure on these nerves. Sometimes using padded gloves can help alleviate pressure on these nerves and reduce the numbness in your hands, but many times, this is caused by a fitting issue. A proper fit reduces the amount of pressure that is put on your arms. During a fit, we may adjust the distance and height your handlebars are from your body. We may also pick a new handlebar to improve your fit, as they come in many sizes and shapes (round or more flat).
MYTH 8: I NEED TO BUY A BIKE FIRST, AND THEN GET FIT TO THE BIKE

You can do it in this order, however at FASTER, we recommend getting a fit first, and taking your fit measurements to find your perfect new bike. Bikes have many different geometries between brands, and even models within a brand. Depending on your riding style, flexibility, goals, and fit measurements, we can help narrow down which options would work best for you and your budget.
MYTH 9: BIKE FITTING IS EXPENSIVE

We’ll admit, cycling isn’t a cheap sport. However, when you consider the costs of a new bike, wheels, or clothing, a bike fit is a minimal investment. At FASTER, we offer two levels of fitting: a 2D/3D fit for $299.99 and a Medical fit for $499.99. We also offer a 3D Speed Lab Fitting for $749.99 which involves a 2D/3D fit and an hour in our wind tunnel. This is for athletes who want to be completely optimized, where power output and respiration rate will be evaluated while aerodynamic drag is also measured. Investing in a fit can also prevent future costs of getting injured or not riding your bike because it was too uncomfortable.
MYTH 10: I ONLY GET DISCOMFORT WHEN I GO LONGER DISTANCES ON MY BIKE… SHOULD I JUST RIDE SHORTER DISTANCES FROM NOW ON?

Riding longer distances should be enjoyable yet challenging. A proper bike fit will ensure that no matter the distance you are riding, you are optimized in comfort and performance. You never have to resort to shorter distances on your bike rides, unless you absolutely want to.

 

article from thetrihub

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What is Drafting in triathlon?

25 Oct , 2016  

please watch

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List all you need in Triathlon

4 Dec , 2014  

triathlon

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News: Schwalbe presents the final Procore-System for 2015

28 Aug , 2014  

Massive grip and high protection against punctures. – This is what Schwalbe promises. The Schwalbe Procore system proved itself able to handle the pressure on the race cicuit over the last couple of weeks. Nico Lau won the Enduro World Series races in Scotland and Sam Hill, the last Downhill Worldcup in Meribel, both riding procore.

There have been rumors about the new Schwalbe Procore system. But it is already clear that the system carries two air chambers. One evening after demo-day, Schwalbe revealed the new system, and it was immediately obvious they had made some new clever changes. Initially prototype versions had two valves, requiring modification to the rims, but Shwalbe presented the system with just one valve. Additionally, there have been some changes to their range of tyres too.

 

Massive grip and high protection against punctures. – This is what Schwalbe promises.  The Schwalbe Procore system proved itself able to handle the pressure on the race cicuit over the last couple of weeks. Nico Lau won the Enduro World Series races in Scotland and Sam Hill, the last Downhill Worldcup in Meribel, both riding procore.

Massive grip and high protection against punctures. – This is what Schwalbe promises.
The Schwalbe Procore system proved itself able to handle the pressure on the race cicuit over the last couple of weeks. Nico Lau won the Enduro World Series races in Scotland and Sam Hill, the last Downhill Worldcup in Meribel, both riding procore.

 

Massive grip and high protection against punctures. – This is what Schwalbe promises.

The Schwalbe Procore system proved itself able to handle the pressure on the race cicuit over the last couple of weeks. Nico Lau won the Enduro World Series races in Scotland and Sam Hill, the last Downhill Worldcup in Meribel, both riding procore.

 

Massive grip and high protection against punctures. – This is what Schwalbe promises.  The Schwalbe Procore system proved itself able to handle the pressure on the race cicuit over the last couple of weeks. Nico Lau won the Enduro World Series races in Scotland and Sam Hill, the last Downhill Worldcup in Meribel, both riding procore.

Massive grip and high protection against punctures. – This is what Schwalbe promises.
The Schwalbe Procore system proved itself able to handle the pressure on the race cicuit over the last couple of weeks. Nico Lau won the Enduro World Series races in Scotland and Sam Hill, the last Downhill Worldcup in Meribel, both riding procore.

Massive grip and high protection against punctures. – This is what Schwalbe promises.  The Schwalbe Procore system proved itself able to handle the pressure on the race cicuit over the last couple of weeks. Nico Lau won the Enduro World Series races in Scotland and Sam Hill, the last Downhill Worldcup in Meribel, both riding procore.

Massive grip and high protection against punctures. – This is what Schwalbe promises.
The Schwalbe Procore system proved itself able to handle the pressure on the race cicuit over the last couple of weeks. Nico Lau won the Enduro World Series races in Scotland and Sam Hill, the last Downhill Worldcup in Meribel, both riding procore.