Slide background
Slide background
Slide background
Slide background

Event News,Events,Review:,Triathlon,Triathlon News,Triathlon Philippines

Ironman Phuket

29 Nov , 2017  

ironman phuket

Had a great fun week end race at imphuket 70.3
Swim
Water is so calm good course. But some of the racer swim breast stroke. Is it legal? The first 400 meters swim was so intense all the racer is excited. And the 700 meters is a battle. some are strong swimmer to over take. And its nice because it’s not crowded with a marshal with speed boat and kayak. The struggle came up when you see a jellyfish around but over all its good.
Bike
First 10km uphill ride upto 16km. after a rolling hills a speed highway course battling in the heavy trucks and cars. the bike course is good because of a lot of hydration checkpoint. Choice of water or gatorade.
Run
Run leg is great and we are blessed that the weather is not hot. There’s a lot of banana and water container to use if you want shower.

Blogs,Review:,Triathlon,Triathlon News,Triathlon Philippines

Cervélo’s P5X Is Ready To Crush The Resistance

5 Oct , 2016  

 

Cervélo’s P5X triathlon philippines partner wit enve

Cervélo P5X
The P5X is a radical departure from anything Cervélo has designed in the past and took three years to develop. The ultimate goal of this bike is to meet the specific needs of triathletes by offering an abundance of storage with an easy to adjust frame, making it arguably the most user-friendly superbike available. While the practicality of this bike is commendable, the price will put it out of reach for the vast majority of interested triathletes. The bike comes in two builds: the Shimano Ultegra Di2 option has an MSRP of $11,000 and the SRAM eTap model (pictured) has an MSRP of $15,000.

Cervélo’s P5X triathlon philippines

Cervélo partnered with travel case manufacturer Biknd to create a custom case for the P5X. The case has internal airbags, can store two sets of wheels and requires minimal disassembly. MSRP is $850.

Cervélo’s P5X triathlon philippines

Biknd P5X Travel Case
This view shows the P5X with the bars folded down packed away in the Biknd custom case.

Cervélo’s P5X triathlon philippines ride

Cervélo’s P5X triathlon philippines

Cervélo’s P5X triathlon philippines disck brake

Cervélo designed the P5X around disc brakes for two main reasons: they could make the frame more aerodynamic and give the bike better stopping power. 160mm front and rear rotors give the P5X plenty of stopping power and 12mm thru axles increase stiffness.

 

 

 

 

 

Cervélo’s P5X triathlon philippines aero handle bar

Cervélo’s P5X triathlon philippines aero handle bar

 

Cervélo partnered with ENVE to design the super clean front end of the bike. The base bar can be flipped up or down, but the bigger story is that this is actually a two-piece component that folds in half to make the bike easier to pack.

Cervélo’s P5X triathlon philippines storage

The Speedcase is a clever storage addition to the frame that attaches to the downtube. Bottle mounts on top of the Speedcase add versatility and a level of customization to the bike. You could potentially choose to race with the Speedcase and a bottle for an Ironman, Speedcase and no no bottle for a half, or no Speedcase for an Olympic or sprint. Cervélo’s P5X triathlon philippines Stealthbox storage

 

Unlike the Speedcase, the Stealthbox storage compartment is built into the frame. This is likely where you’d store flat repair items like spare tubes and tire levers.

News,Review:,Triathlon Philippines

Chris Froome’s New Ultralight Pinarello F8 Climbing Bike | Tour De France 2016

10 Jul , 2016  

News,Review:,Tips and tricks,Triathlon Philippines

2015 CANNONDALE CAAD10 GETS DISC BRAKE READY, SYNAPSE CARBON LINEUP GROWS AND MORE

26 Jun , 2014  

2015-Cannondale-CAAD10-Discbrake-road-bike02-600x392

2015 CANNONDALE CAAD10 GETS DISC BRAKE READY, SYNAPSE CARBON LINEUP GROWS AND MORE.

Cannondale’s 2015 road and cyclocross bike lineup commits to disc brakes, giving more road bike models the option and going all in for ‘cross. That’s right, all CAAD-X and SuperX cyclocross bikes are disc brake only, no more cantilever options. There’ll even be a SRAM CX1 build in the lineup!

The well regarded alloy CAAD10 models switched to internal routing for MY2014, and the new disc brake versions use it for both shift and brake runs. Cable ports are swappable for mechanical or electronic systems.

Check more details plus the slick new Synapse bikes and more below

2015-Cannondale-CAAD10-Discbrake-road-bike02-600x392

2015-Cannondale-CAAD10-Discbrake-road-bike02-600×392

2015-Cannondale-CAAD10-Discbrake-road-bike03-600x399

2015-Cannondale-CAAD10-Discbrake-road-bike03-600×399

Rear brake mount and dropout is forged from a single piece, which is stronger while saving weight and insuring perfect alignment. The rear triangle was redesigned to mimic the feel of the original. By changing the wall thickness throughout the tube’s radius, they got the same flex profile. It’s only about 5mm or less, but it’ll take the edge off bumps.

2015-Cannondale-CAAD10-Discbrake-road-bike09-600x399

2015-Cannondale-CAAD10-Discbrake-road-bike09-600×399

The dropouts get their Speed Tip angled inserts to guide the wheel in more quickly. The brake mounts use a combination of bonded in upper mount and carbon/alloy 3D forged piece on the bottom. So, they’re carbon dropouts with an alloy face and threads. Rotors shown here are not proper spec, it’ll get the new SRAM Centerline rotors.

Review:,Triathlon Philippines

RETUL MACHINE

15 May , 2014  

Retul

So, admittedly, I’ve run quite a few articles recently that are either about Retul or events occurring at Retul’s studio in Boulder. But that’s simply where a lot of very interesting stuff has been going on. It’s still early season right now, and there’s a lot less going on in the gear world than, say, at Interbike time, or during Ironman Hawaii. So, at the risk of saturating you with Retul stuff, I’m plowing ahead with what I consider to be a pretty cool bit of tech.

Retul is really a very interesting company, and one I admire greatly. The began by introducing a concept that no one had ever seen before, their unique motion capture system. That system alone revolutionized the world of bike fitting, providing a level of depth and accuracy that fitters can use to fine-tune both riders and their bikes.

When they first launched, their tool was one cog in an overall fit experience that required inputs from other sources. That is, if you wanted to use a Retul to do your fits, you still had to learn fit protocol from some other source, buy a fit bike from some other source, and then work out on your own what frames your athlete would fit on.

But in recent years, Retul has slowly and steadily begun to encroach on those other areas previously monopolized by just a couple players. Their Retul University classes now include a fit protocol, their Frame Finder software now allows fitters to easily show clients what bikes will fit them, and now they’ve completed the circle by introducing the Muve.

You may be wondering why I want to cover this thing in any depth, since the only customers for the Muve will be shops, and not riders. The reason is simply that it is an important piece of gear in the tri world, and I applaud Retul for going this route. And the more consumers are educated about the options of fit-related gear, the more likely they are to make smart decisions.

Basically Sophisticated

Adjustable cranks let you test anything from 155mm to 185mm.
The Muve is a fit bike that aims to combine the strengths of existing fit bikes, while eliminating their weaknesses. Its main competitors fall into two camps: those that are entirely mechanical, and those that are motor-driven and computer-controlled. In the mechanical-only category are bikes like the old Serrota Size Cycle and the EXiT Fit Bike. Bikes like these are simple, straightforward to use, and less expensive (around $5,000 each). But they have some very real limitations. Chiefly, they require the rider to stop pedaling and get off the bike in order to make any adjustments.

Newer computer-controlled units like the Guru DFU and the Serrota SiCi are much fancier, and allow the bike to adjust with the rider on board, and even while pedaling. They show, with great precision, the stack and reach of the bike at all times. However, these models come at a much greater cost (about $10,000 each), and their fancier features come at the cost of greater complexity. They require mains power to operate, and you have to learn their proprietary software in order to use them. Motor-driven adjustments mean that there are more parts that could potentially break or require maintenance.

The Muve enters the market right in between these two categories, and I love what it does. Retul obviously has a TON of experience fitting riders, and using all of the aforementioned fit bikes. They saw limitations in existing offerings, and had an idea to improve upon them. Kindof the same philosophy that drove me to make my Omega brake. So what is it? For starters, it’s entirely mechanical – there’s no motor to break, no software to learn, and no power cable to plug in. And as a big bonus, it can be serviced entirely by a regular bike shop mechanic. No expensive bits to send in for repair. Yet, like the expensive computer-controlled units, it is continuously adjustable with the rider on-board and pedaling. Simple hand knobs allow the fitter to dial the contact points, one millimeter at a time, independently for saddle stack, saddle reach, bar stack, and bar reach. It’s effective and brilliantly simple.

The optional cranks are Purely Custom adjustable cranks that go from 155mm to 185mm, allowing the rider to test out any length they desire. The only metric on the bike that isn’t adjustable is the Q-factor, or crank stance width. But currently no fit bike on the market has adjustment in this dimension. And while it’s essentially all mechanical as stated, ther is one optional piece of battery-operated equipment on the Muve: the CycleOps Powerbeam Pro on the rear wheel, which will let you know what happens to power output as the fit changes, or to lock the rider into a specific power output and see where it feels easiest to achieve.

That’s really the long and the short of this very smart bike. It slots in right between the price points of its competition with a starting price just under $7,500 (that’s without the CycleOps or the adjustable crank). If I were a fitter, I’d take a long hard look at this machine before investing in its competitors – particularly the more expensive units. And if I were going in for a bike fit, I’d want to know that my fitter had done that kind of thinking. It’s a sweet piece of kit, and has likely got the computer-controlled folk worried jut a bit.

Retul

Retul

Retul machine

Retul machine

That rear wheel is sitting on the optional CycleOps power meter to show how position changes affect rider output

Retul adjustable crank

Retul adjustable crank

Events,Review:,Triathlon Philippines

BMC Philippines Launch 2014

23 Jan , 2014  

BMC Philippines recently held a launch party for our dealers, athletes, race organizers and a few friends. Thanks to everyone that made it. Tag away! We had a great time. See you at the races, on the road, and on the trail!

Photo credit form BMC Philippines

Review:

2014 New Trek Speed Concept

14 Jan , 2014  

When Trek unveiled the original Speed Concept back in 2009, it was a total jaw-dropper. No one had ever seen a frame with components so beautifully integrated from tip to tail. Virtually every cable on the bike was completely hidden, the word “Kammtail” became part of the triathlete’s vernacular, and hidden centerpull brakes gave the bike the cleanliness of a track rig. It was amazing, and put Trek’s competitors on notice that they needed to step up their game. 
Fast forward to today, and it’s easy to see the Speed Concept’s influence on the triathlon world. Bikes like the BMC TM01, Cervelo P5, Pinarelo Bolide, and Felt’s brand new IA owe plenty of design inspiration to Trek’s excellent work with the SC. Canon Bicycles even gave a similar name to their SC-esque rig, the Canyon Concept Speedmax. Trek’s influence on the market is undeniable. Integrated brakes are everywhere. Truncated airfoils have taken center stage. And best of all, the market has begun to focus on the message that a tri-specific fit is the most important component of the bicycle purchase, thanks to the runaway success of the Speed Concept. 

So where does Trek go from here? Can lightning strike twice? Is there a way to refresh the platform and make it new and exciting, without losing what made it so special in the first place? The answer is a resounding YES. The 2014 Speed Concept isn’t just an awesome new rig, it’s proof that Trek listens to its customers. Virtually every complaint I could come up with about the original bike has been addressed in one way or another on the new bike. I’m so excited about what Trek has done here, I can barely keep my thoughts in order. I’m going to try to write this review in the usual way I do in-depth frame features: start from the front of the bike and work my way back and down. And that’s fitting, because probably the coolest stuff about the new bike is in the new front-end, specifically that insanely awesome aerobar. 
But before we dive into all the specifics, it’s worth noting that Trek hasn’t just revised the original Speed Concept. This isn’t an incremental update; it’s a completely new bike, with entirely new molds, and a set of completely revised mechanical concepts. 
So hit the jump, and let’s get started.
Ordinarily, I wouldn’t spend an entire page devoted to just one component of the bike. But in the case of the new Speed Concept, that may barely do it justice. This new bar is a wildly new design, and since the first time I saw the thing, from a race image of the bike underneath Fabian Cancellara, I was determined to check it out firsthand. 
The first thing you notice about this bar is that it doesn’t have the traditional double-pedestal design that virtually every bar on the market uses. This bad boy has just a single riser, to which both arm pads and both extensions are attached. This isn’t the first time we’ve seen this concept, since it appeared in some of Cervelo’s P5 development prototypes. shown off at the expo of the 2011 edition of Ironman Hawaii. But Trek is the first one to take the bold step of putting it into a production bike. 
The single-riser design, which Trek calls its Monospacer design, both reduces frontal area and provides some potent solutions to problems that plagued the original Speed Concept. The first of these is the tilt mechanism. On the original bike, extension tilt was controlled independently on each side, via a relatively small cylinder that was clamped to an overwhelming 14 Nm of force, the extent of which wasn’t even sufficient to keep them put. If you hit a big bump, the weight of your arms could throw one or both of extensions out of alignment, even with the ungodly torque on those through-bolts. The new design is both completely secure, requires much less torque to operate, and ensures that both extensions remain in perfect symmetry adjusted. It’s brilliant. 
My only real complaint about the Monospacer and Monoextension system is that, as of this writing, you are limited to the extensions that Trek makes, and you can’t achieve any roll adjustment (twisting the extensions inward). I always roll my extensions inward, so it’s a little annoying not to be able to do that. And I’d like to be able to put different extensions on the bike. However, this too is something that Trek is working on. Soon enough, you’ll be able to buy a Monoextension that also contains clamping hardware for traditional 22.2mm extensions. It’ll allow you to use your favorite extensions, roll them inward, AND adjust the reach independent of the rest of the aerobar hardware. I haven’t been able to get my hands on this new piece, but I hope to do so in the near future. Hopefully it doesn’t compromise the beautiful aesthetics and aerodynamics of this lovely bar. Speaking of which, the base bar remains an ultra-deep airfoil, and now has been revised to have flat hand holds, which I personally prefer. But if you want something for your hand to press against, Trek provides little bumpers that you can put under the bar tape to provide that. 
Next up is the internal cable routing. The new route through the Monoextension and Monospacer is amazing, and completely hides the cables. In this way, it achieves the last remaining improvement on hidden cables left behind by its predecessor, which left a bit of exposed cable from the extensions going into the base bar. However, this improvement comes with a small cost: any time you want to swap out your Monospacer to adjust stack height, you have to reroute your shifter cables. If you’re running an electronic shifting system (and if you paid the big money for this frame, you really SHOULD be using electronic components of some kind or another), the cable routing isn’t as big a deal. You just have to unplug your shifters, adjust, and plug them back in. It’s a lot nicer than having to rerun an entirely new steel cable. But it’s still more difficult than just adding a spacer and keeping everything else intact. This is just the cost of the integrated bar. 
As with the original Speed Concept, you CAN choose to take off the integrated bar entirely, use the “Steerer Stub” component, and run any bar/stem combo you like. Of course, you’ll have a very hard time matching the smooth aesthetics and brilliant aerodynamic design of the integrated components, but you could probably find hardware that provided a more convenient way to adjust your position. But ultimately, the integrated bar is amazing. It uses fewer bolts than its predecessor, those bolts require less torque to hold the hardware in place, and the full combination of parts is lighter. They could be made lighter still, with some refinement of some of the beefier parts, but there’s very little to complain about with this bar. It’s really awesome. 
Hit the jump and let’s talk about the frame and the fit of the bike.

Source : http://www.tririg.com/articles.php?id=2014_01_Trek_New_Speed_Concept_Review

Review:

2014 New Trek Speed Concept

14 Jan , 2014  

When Trek unveiled the original Speed Concept back in 2009, it was a total jaw-dropper. No one had ever seen a frame with components so beautifully integrated from tip to tail. Virtually every cable on the bike was completely hidden, the word “Kammtail” became part of the triathlete’s vernacular, and hidden centerpull brakes gave the bike the cleanliness of a track rig. It was amazing, and put Trek’s competitors on notice that they needed to step up their game. 
Fast forward to today, and it’s easy to see the Speed Concept’s influence on the triathlon world. Bikes like the BMC TM01, Cervelo P5, Pinarelo Bolide, and Felt’s brand new IA owe plenty of design inspiration to Trek’s excellent work with the SC. Canon Bicycles even gave a similar name to their SC-esque rig, the Canyon Concept Speedmax. Trek’s influence on the market is undeniable. Integrated brakes are everywhere. Truncated airfoils have taken center stage. And best of all, the market has begun to focus on the message that a tri-specific fit is the most important component of the bicycle purchase, thanks to the runaway success of the Speed Concept. 

So where does Trek go from here? Can lightning strike twice? Is there a way to refresh the platform and make it new and exciting, without losing what made it so special in the first place? The answer is a resounding YES. The 2014 Speed Concept isn’t just an awesome new rig, it’s proof that Trek listens to its customers. Virtually every complaint I could come up with about the original bike has been addressed in one way or another on the new bike. I’m so excited about what Trek has done here, I can barely keep my thoughts in order. I’m going to try to write this review in the usual way I do in-depth frame features: start from the front of the bike and work my way back and down. And that’s fitting, because probably the coolest stuff about the new bike is in the new front-end, specifically that insanely awesome aerobar. 
But before we dive into all the specifics, it’s worth noting that Trek hasn’t just revised the original Speed Concept. This isn’t an incremental update; it’s a completely new bike, with entirely new molds, and a set of completely revised mechanical concepts. 
So hit the jump, and let’s get started.
Ordinarily, I wouldn’t spend an entire page devoted to just one component of the bike. But in the case of the new Speed Concept, that may barely do it justice. This new bar is a wildly new design, and since the first time I saw the thing, from a race image of the bike underneath Fabian Cancellara, I was determined to check it out firsthand. 
The first thing you notice about this bar is that it doesn’t have the traditional double-pedestal design that virtually every bar on the market uses. This bad boy has just a single riser, to which both arm pads and both extensions are attached. This isn’t the first time we’ve seen this concept, since it appeared in some of Cervelo’s P5 development prototypes. shown off at the expo of the 2011 edition of Ironman Hawaii. But Trek is the first one to take the bold step of putting it into a production bike. 
The single-riser design, which Trek calls its Monospacer design, both reduces frontal area and provides some potent solutions to problems that plagued the original Speed Concept. The first of these is the tilt mechanism. On the original bike, extension tilt was controlled independently on each side, via a relatively small cylinder that was clamped to an overwhelming 14 Nm of force, the extent of which wasn’t even sufficient to keep them put. If you hit a big bump, the weight of your arms could throw one or both of extensions out of alignment, even with the ungodly torque on those through-bolts. The new design is both completely secure, requires much less torque to operate, and ensures that both extensions remain in perfect symmetry adjusted. It’s brilliant. 
My only real complaint about the Monospacer and Monoextension system is that, as of this writing, you are limited to the extensions that Trek makes, and you can’t achieve any roll adjustment (twisting the extensions inward). I always roll my extensions inward, so it’s a little annoying not to be able to do that. And I’d like to be able to put different extensions on the bike. However, this too is something that Trek is working on. Soon enough, you’ll be able to buy a Monoextension that also contains clamping hardware for traditional 22.2mm extensions. It’ll allow you to use your favorite extensions, roll them inward, AND adjust the reach independent of the rest of the aerobar hardware. I haven’t been able to get my hands on this new piece, but I hope to do so in the near future. Hopefully it doesn’t compromise the beautiful aesthetics and aerodynamics of this lovely bar. Speaking of which, the base bar remains an ultra-deep airfoil, and now has been revised to have flat hand holds, which I personally prefer. But if you want something for your hand to press against, Trek provides little bumpers that you can put under the bar tape to provide that. 
Next up is the internal cable routing. The new route through the Monoextension and Monospacer is amazing, and completely hides the cables. In this way, it achieves the last remaining improvement on hidden cables left behind by its predecessor, which left a bit of exposed cable from the extensions going into the base bar. However, this improvement comes with a small cost: any time you want to swap out your Monospacer to adjust stack height, you have to reroute your shifter cables. If you’re running an electronic shifting system (and if you paid the big money for this frame, you really SHOULD be using electronic components of some kind or another), the cable routing isn’t as big a deal. You just have to unplug your shifters, adjust, and plug them back in. It’s a lot nicer than having to rerun an entirely new steel cable. But it’s still more difficult than just adding a spacer and keeping everything else intact. This is just the cost of the integrated bar. 
As with the original Speed Concept, you CAN choose to take off the integrated bar entirely, use the “Steerer Stub” component, and run any bar/stem combo you like. Of course, you’ll have a very hard time matching the smooth aesthetics and brilliant aerodynamic design of the integrated components, but you could probably find hardware that provided a more convenient way to adjust your position. But ultimately, the integrated bar is amazing. It uses fewer bolts than its predecessor, those bolts require less torque to hold the hardware in place, and the full combination of parts is lighter. They could be made lighter still, with some refinement of some of the beefier parts, but there’s very little to complain about with this bar. It’s really awesome. 
Hit the jump and let’s talk about the frame and the fit of the bike.

Source : http://www.tririg.com/articles.php?id=2014_01_Trek_New_Speed_Concept_Review